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Wednesday, April 26
 

8:00am

Acknowledgements
The Undergraduate Research Program would like to give a speical thanks to everyone who assisted in the organizing and planning of the 2017 Spring Symposium on Undergraduate Research Creativity and Community Engagement.

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:00am - 8:00am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

Extended Acknowledgements
Wilma Sherrill Center Staff, Highsmith Union Staff, UNCA Foundation

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:00am - 8:00am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

Mission Statement
The mission of the UNC Asheville Undergraduate Research Program is to provide students with a wide variety of research, scholarly and creative opportunities that support and supplement other education activities. The Program encourages students and faculty mentors to engage in the complete active research process, including design and implementation of projects and dissemination of results.

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:00am - 8:00am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

Program Committee Members
Mark Harvey Director Undergraduate Research Program, Mila Lemaster Program Coordinator, Undergraduate Research Program, Mary Topper Office Assistant Undergradutate Research Program, Ed Katz Associate Provost and University Dean, Office of the Provost, Aaron Dahlstrom Social Media & Communications Manager

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:00am - 8:00am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

UNC Asheville Foundation Inc.
For their continued support to the Undergraduate Research Program

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:00am - 8:00am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

Faculty Moderators
Robert Tynes, Christopher Bell, Gerard Voos, Heidi Kelley, Robert Tynes, Judy Leavitt, Ann Dunn, John Wood, George Heard, Melissa Mahoney, Jennifer Ward, Gary Ettari, Amanda Wolfe, Sonia DiPalma, Joseph Urgo, Bert Holmes, Melissa Smith, Brian Felix, David Gillette, Karin Peterson, Lyndi Hewitt, John Brock, Laura Jones, Amanda Wray, Mark West, Lorena Russell, Irene Rossell, Susan Reiser, Eva Bares, Leisa Rundquist, Jonathan Horton, Jackson Martin, Ted Meigs, Marietta Cameron, Scott Walters, Great Trautmann, Becky Sanft, Angel Kaur, James Perkins, Lisa Friedenberg, Melissa Himelein, Evelyn Chiang,Katherine Zubko.

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:00am - 6:00pm
UNC Asheville

8:20am

A House United
Pack’s Tavern’s servers must know the menu very well because they must answer questions from their diners as well as submit detailed order information to the kitchen through the Point Of Sale (POS) application. Translating the diners’ wishes to the POS input format can be time-consuming and problematic. In addition, the current system is old and does not allow for easy, intuitive user customization. My project, A House United, provides both the servers and the kitchen staff a complete and customizable menu database and ordering system. As a Android tablet app, it allows the kitchen staff to stop using printed orders and to communicate directly with the servers.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:20am - 8:40am
125 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

8:30am

Chemical and genetic modification of key sites in E. coli F1FO ATP Synthase.
ATP Synthase is a complex integral membrane protein consisting of two rotary motors: the FO portion, which is embedded in the cell membrane, and the F1 portion, which is located on the inside of the cell. ATP synthase is the primary generator of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which is an energy rich molecule required for a variety of critical cellular functions. As important as ATP synthase is, the mechanics of exactly how it works are still not completely known. The FO rotor transduces an electrochemical gradient of protons into mechanical rotation of an oligomeric ring of c subunits. Several amino acids, e.g. phenylalanine 54 (F54), have been identified within subunit c that, when mutated to cysteine, have shown to allow synthesis of ATP while inhibiting ATP-driven proton pumping. I plan to chemically and genetically alter the structure of these amino acids to try to understand the specific characteristics that affect subunit c’s function. The addition of a propyl group to the cysteine side chain at the F54 position has shown to restore some function in the ATP-driven proton pumping direction. These results suggest that hydrophobic bulk may have a functional role at that position.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

Computational studies on the oxidation and reduction of copper sulfonamides
Strongly chelating ligands such as sulfonamides (sulf) are important in separation of metals, particularly in isolating trace elements. Further understanding of the nature of sulfonamide bonding could lead to a strong extraction agent for specific metals found in natural mineral deposits. It was determined experimentally that copper(II) coordinated to two sulfonamide ligands, Cu(sulf)2, had unusual geometric and potentiometric properties, being particularly stable with respect to multiple oxidations and reductions. Starting from the single-crystal X-ray generated geometry of Cu(sulf)2, a series of oxidized and reduced forms are studied using Density Functional Theory (DFT) and the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (ATAIM), in order to determine likely oxidation and reduction sites, and the nature of bonding of the ligand.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

Development of a robust synthetic scheme to produce C9 analogs of the antibiotic pestalone.
Pestalone is a natural product originally isolated in 2001 from a cofermentation of a marine fungus and bacterium. It has been synthesized by multiple groups including Nishiyama et al., Nikolay Slavov et al., and Ling Liu et al who found pestalone to have highly potent antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MIC = 37 ng/mL) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium bacteria (MIC = 78 ng/mL). Unfortunately, this natural product can be rendered inactive due to an intramolecular cyclization between the C9 aldehyde and the bridging ketone forming a lactone. The goal of this project is to develop a reaction scheme to successfully produce pestalone analogs replacing the aldehyde with a range of electronic and steric functional groups to reduce the undesired reactivity while maintaining or improving antibacterial activity. Eighteen analogs were synthesized using a two step synthesis involving first a grignard addition of bromobenzene to a substituted phthalic anhydride(30-99% Yield) and then modifying the produced carboxylic acid through esterification(15-76% Yield) or amidation(7-93% Yield). These analogs were then subjected to a broth dilution minimum inhibitory concentration assay against Staphylococcus aureus and it was found that the analogs with the carboxylic acid only showed activity.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

Engineering of alternative lipidation sites in Gα13 to examine effects on growth signalling
G proteins relay information from G-coupled protein receptors (GPCRs) to downstream molecular targets, driving large scale cellular process such as proliferation, differentiation, and migration. Overexpression of Gα13, a member of the G12/13 subfamily, is demonstrably oncogenic and has been implicated in breast, oral, esophageal and colon cancer. Lipidation is a post translational modification universal to G proteins, in which a fatty acid chain is attached to the protein, localizing it to the plasma membrane. These fatty acid adducts play a large role in how G proteins are regulated, and there is evidence they are involved in protein binding. Lipidations such as myristoylation (14:0) and palmitoylation (16:0) occur in all G proteins, sometimes in combination. Gα13 which is only palmitoylated, was previously engineered with PCR mutagenesis to remove amino acids necessary for palmitoylation to occur. These mutants were then modified at the N terminus with the DNA coding sequence from GαT and Gαi, both of which are myristoylated. Lysates from HEK 293 cells transfected with these plasmids were then tested for their ability to drive an SRE-luciferase assay. Loss of SRE signaling by non-palmitoylated chimeras was rescued by the addition of myristoylation sites. Future work will use GST fusion proteins to determine each chimera’s ability to bind with known G13 effectors.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

Examination of decomposition reactions for HCFC's
HCl2I was synthesized with the intention of using photocatalysis facilitated by Hg2I2 to generate chemically activated CHCl2CHCl2 from radical CHCl2. The unimolecular decomposition reactions and their rates would then be quantified based on the ratio of decomposed products. Radical CF3 and radical CHCl2 would then be reacted to form chemically activated CF3CHCl2. Its decomposition reactions and rates would then be determined based on the ratio of products. The intention behind this project is to expand data on the reactions that hydrochlorofluorocarbons will undergo, as they are a commercially important class of greenhouse gases, which are in the process of being re-engineered to be more environmentally friendly. Understanding the reactions they will undergo is key to their efficient recycling.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

Glucuronidation Kinetics of Long-Chain Phthalate Monoesters by Human UGT-glucuronosyltransferases
Phthalate monoesters, the endocrine-active primary metabolites of phthalate diesters found in a variety of common products, affect reproductive development in male fetuses. Lipases convert phthalate diesters into monoesters during Phase I metabolism. During Phase II, phthalate monoesters further biotransform using UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes (UGTs) and are excreted in urine, eliminating their toxic potential. Data suggest a significant minority of people glucuronidate poorly, leaving them more susceptible to the effects of phthalate diesters, as well as conditions like Gilbert’s syndrome and Crigler-Najjar syndrome. Little data exists on the enzymatic kinetics of UGTs on most phthalate monoester substrates, so the goal of the present study is to determine the kinetic relationship between three UGT isoforms UGT1A3, UGT1A8, and UGT2B7; and three phthalate monoester substrates mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), monobutyl phthalate (MBP), and mono-n-octyl phthalate (MNOP). Previous research suggests that these isoforms fit the Michaelis-Menten model on MEHP substrates, so the selected isoforms will be tested to see if they show similar kinetic behavior when metabolizing other long chain phthalate monoesters to provide a deeper understanding of the glucuronidation of phthalate monoesters. In addition, using a dataset from a previous study, we will examine the relationship between the ratio of conjugated to unconjugated phthalate monoester and total monoester concentration in a single human subject to better understand factors that relate to lower levels of UGT expression in an individual.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

Investigation of periodic trends in catalytic activity for O-H and C-H bond cleavage of ethanol by periodic density functional theory
Steam reforming reactions that generate hydrogen from biomolecules using a non-precious metal catalyst are becoming ever more valuable as the need for sustainable energy production processes increase. Thirteen transition metals were examined for their catalytic ability in ethanol dehydrogenation reactions: Ag, Au, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ir, Ni, Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru, and Zn, which includes both precious metal and non-precious metal catalysts. The reactions were examined using periodic density functional theory models of the catalyst surface as a (111) surface and (211) surface plane and reaction energies were calculated after a multi-step geometry optimization of the surface-adsorbate system. Optimum geometries and reaction energies were determined for C-H and O-H cleavage reactions over all metals to investigate periodic trends in catalytic activity. Trends in C-C and C-O bond distances of ethanol and its dehydrogenation products, as markers of changes in intramolecular bonding, and trends in ΔEC-H and ΔEO-H reaction energies were examined and will be presented.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

Investigations of Carbon-Carbon Double Bond Cleavage Reactions Over Rh (111) Planar Versus Rh (211) Stepped Lattice Structures
Issues related to the burning of fossil fuels have prompted a world-wide search for clean and sustainable alternative fuel sources in the 21st century. Hydrogen powered fuel cells show great promise among the most recent alternatives due to their fuel efficiency and remarkably low emission levels. However, as hydrogen gas is not abundant in the atmosphere, it is mostly generated via steam reforming (SR) of natural gas, which is a nonrenewable resource. Instead, SR of organic materials from plants, such as sugars and alcohols, is a more sustainable way to produce hydrogen gas for use in fuel cells. The heterogeneous catalytic reactions that occur in SR are still being intensively researched in order to improve the process’ efficiency and viability. This study uses computational chemistry to investigate potential trends in the cleaving of C-C double bonds in simple alcohols by comparing results of reactions taking place over a Rhodium (111) planar surface to the findings of a previous research that looked at reactions over a stepped Rh (211) surface. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed using the software Vienna Ab-Initio Simulation Package (VASP). Preliminary results are currently being evaluated.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

Mobile-Styled, Low Resource Qualitative and Quantitative Laboratory Experimental Methods
There is a need for mobile-styled, low resource laboratory experimental methods, which do not require the use of expensive chemicals, chemical glassware, and instrumentation, as well as running water, and constant electricity. The purpose of this experiment is to create qualitative and quantitative laboratory methods, with the primary goal to produce these mobile styled, low resource experimental methods. The focus of the experiment is to be able to apply these experimental methods to be used by rural institutions and countries, such as Ghana. Is it possible to create mobile-styled and low resource experiments, which reach a specific set of student objectives?

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

PHOTODEGRADATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN THE PRESENCE OF TITANIUM DIOXIDE NANOPARTICLES
With the increase in presence of common industrial waste solvents in the nation’s water supply, it has become increasingly necessary to find affordable and viable means of water purification that are commercially viable. Nanoparticles (NPs) with their size and resultant large surface area offer new pathways to such successful purification. Titanium Dioxide (TiO2), as a widely available, non-toxic material, is optimal for use as a filtration medium. The photocatalytic properties of these NPs are of particular interest in the filtration of contaminants due to their photocatalytic characteristics in the presence of the organic contaminants and ultraviolet light. In this study, the effectiveness of TiO2 NPs as a medium for the photodegradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) is explored. Preliminary data suggest that TiO2 is an effective medium for the removal of TCE from aqueous solutions.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

Prevalence of 9 monoester phthalates in the Okavango Delta, Botswana.
The Okavango Delta in northern Botswana is a 6,000-15,000 km2 seasonal wetland which is home to hundreds of species of wildlife, including birds, fish, crocodiles, and hippopotami. The delta fluctuates in size based on time of year and rainfall. The many species that inhabit the area rely on its waters to reproduce and feed. The presence of phthalates is an area of emerging concern in this water system because of recent changes in agricultural practices upstream. The presences of 9 monoester phthalates were analyzed using LC/MS/MS on samples taken from the summer of 2016. Initially, levels of monobutyl, monoisobutyl, and monoethyl phthalate were found to be above 100 parts per billion (ppb). A healthy water system may have phthalates at approximately 5-10 ppb. Further analysis will provide information on the source and the effects of these compounds. Preserving the reproductive health of wildlife in the Okavango Delta relies on a natural and clean water system. Quantitative analysis of monoester phthalates is a necessary step in ensuring that the Okavango Delta continues to be a functioning habitat for the wildlife of northern Botswana.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

Reconstitution of E. coli F1FO into artificial membranes to examine the effects of lipid composition
ATP synthase catalyzes the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate by use of two rotary, designated F1 and FO, within the F1FO complex. ATP is the primary carrier of chemical energy in all life forms. The membrane-embedded FO motor uses a H+ gradient created by the electron transport chain to drive rotation of the c ring, which drives the conformational changes within the subunits α and β subunits of the F1 motor that catalyze ADP and phosphate into ATP. The mechanism of how the protons flow through ATP synthase to generate the torque on the c-ring remains unclear. Prior research has shown that the lipid composition of the membrane can influence the functions of the proteins embedded within it. To examine the effects of lipid composition on ATP synthase, the F1F0 complex was purified out of E. coli cells and tested for ATPase activity. F1FO will be reconstituted back into liposomes with varying lipid composition, especially focusing on the concentration of phosphatidylethanolamine, which is usually found in the membranes of E. coli. The ultimate objective of this project is to see if the presence or lack of specific lipids has any effect on ATP synthesis.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

Spectroscopic Study of mechanical movement in the F o motor of E. coli ATP synthase
F1Fo ATP synthase is present in all life and is responsible for the production of almost all adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which is one of the most prolific energy molecules that are synthesized during metabolism. Fo converts electrochemical potential into mechanical rotation, which drives conformational changes in F1 that facilitate the synthesis of ATP. The mechanism of rotation of the subunit c ring is not known, but there are currently two hypotheses. This study will look for evidence of the ratcheting mechanism of rotation, which states that the helices of subunits a and c act like mechanical gears during rotation. This mechanism would require the α-helices of subunit a that lie on the a-c interface to move during rotation. Site directed mutagenesis was used to mutate a residue on one of these helices into a cysteine. This mutant ATP synthase will be purified and then chemically modified with a spin label, which can be observed using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The EPR signal is sensitive to the protein environment and will provide data on the mobility of the residue to which the spin label is attached. This could also clarify the possibility of mechanical movement in the Fo complex.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

Structural Dynamics of Subunit a in the FO Motor of E. coli ATP Synthase
Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the energy currency of the cell, is primarily synthesized by F1FO ATP synthase. This protein complex converts the proton motive force set up by cellular metabolism into chemical energy through a set of coupled molecular motors. The FO region of ATP synthase is embedded in the membrane, and proton translocation at the subunit a/c interface generates torque on the c ring. This mechanical rotation drives conformational changes in the catalytic sites of F1. A Brownian ratchet mechanism has been proposed for the FO motor in which the conversion of thermal motion to unidirectional motion occurs by regulating aqueous access to two compartments with different pH. However, this mechanism neglects evidence that subunit a may undergo conformational changes during ATP synthesis, which if correct, could have functional importance that sheds light on the problem of extracting torque from random motion. This study will use electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to measure structural dynamics of subunit a under various conditions. Cysteine mutations have been genetically introduced into the a subunit, and the mutant proteins will be purified and chemically modified with spin labels, which can be detected by EPR. EPR data will be analyzed with aim of inferring protein movements and integrating these into a description of the FO motor mechanism.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

Synthesis and Antibacterial Evaluation of the Natural Product Pseudopyronine A, and Core α-Pyrone Derivatives
With antibiotic resistance becoming an increasing problem in society it is vital for chemists to search for more possibilities for antibacterial products to combat this growing issue. α-Pyrone analogs of Pseudopyronine A, an antibacterial natural product isolated from Pseudomonas species, are being synthesized and evaluated for improved antibacterial activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Synthetic analogs are accessed through either the commercially available acyl chloride or β-ketoesters, which will produce the α-pyrone in 5 or 3 steps respectively. The α-pyrones will then be further derivatized through alkylation, amidation, or halogenation reactions. All derivatives will then be evaluated for antibacterial activity in a growth inhibition assay against a panel of both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

Synthesis and Assessment of Modifications to the Central Ring of Depsidone Natural Products
Depsidones are a class of natural products that exhibit antibacterial activity (MIC = 0.0825-8 ppm). In order to increase the antibiotic potency of the depsidone family of natural products, modifications in size and connectivity are being explored. Although a synthesis scheme for the core 6,7,6-fused tricyclic structure of depsidone exists, the yields of the final product are low. In an effort to increase the yields, a new synthetic scheme has been derived which involves Chan-Lam copper catalyzed coupling of boronic acid and a diol substituted benzene rings followed by deprotection and esterification steps to close the central ring. Following this same synthesis scheme, the core structure of depsidone is being modified to change the ester linkage to both an amide and a thioester. These changes will provide insight into the affect the electronic interactions have on antibiotic activity. All analogs synthesized evaluated in an antibacterial assay against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in order to build a structure activity relationship profile for the depsidones.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

Synthesis and Evaluation of Unsubstituted Pyrazoline
Synthesis of pyrazoline derivatives has been an active field of research due to the established biological and pharmaceutical activities of these compounds such as antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Pyrazoline derivatives are produced from the cyclization of chalcones with hydrazine hydrate and aryl aldehyde in the presence of ethanol. Due to the pharmacological effects associated with both chalcone and pyrazoline derivatives, it has been hypothesized that synthesizing a pyrazoline derivative from chalcone will enhance the product’s biological activity. However, the total synthesis of pyrazoline derivatives has been proven to be challenging due to its “one pot” synthesis producing low yields. Progress towards the synthesis of an unsubstituted pyrazoline derivative stemming from the reaction between an unsubstituted chalcone, hydrazine hydrate, and benzaldehyde in the presence of ethanol is presented. The synthetic pathway includes the formation of an unsubstituted chalcone via a Claisen Schmidt condensation to be used as a starting material. The reaction scheme for the unsubstituted pyrazoline acts as a basis for other research projects as the derivative is amenable to the addition of various functional groups. Modifications to enhance the activity of the pyrazoline derivative will be made, including the addition of methoxy groups.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

Synthesis of Anticancer ad DNA Cleaving compounds from Combretastatin A-4
Combretastatin A-4, a naturally occurring compound, isolated from the South African bush willow Combretum Caffrum, has analogs which have demonstrated to provide antibacterial, anti mitotic, anticancer, and antibiotic properties. This research consists of two foci, one for each project: (1) to increase the solubility and biological activity of analogs of Combretastatin A-4 in order to stop cancerous cells from replicating and (2) to induce DNA cleavage via the electrocyclization of derivatives of these analogs. Derivatives of the chalcone backbone will be the basis for the first focus, specifically, Lamellarin pyrroles. These pyrroles have proven to be positively bioactive in the apoptosis of cancerous and multidrug resistant (MDR) cells. Analogs of Lamellarins are recognized to have strong biological potency due to the five-membered nitrogenous ring and the relationship of the planarity between its ABCDE rings. For the first project, derivatives of the Lamellarins pyrrole analogs will serve the purpose of prohibiting cell division by acting as a substrate to bind to the beta-tubulin colchicine binding site during the metaphase stage of mitosis. The binding will occur via the trimethoxy feature of the A ring as the key. Furthermore, modifying the functional groups on the B rings can increase the solubility and biological activity within the bloodstream. For the second project, ynediene electrocyclizations of the Lamellarin pyrroles produce heterocyclic di-radicals which may have the ability to act as an unstable warhead to potentially induce DNA cleavage.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

The Investigation of the Cyclocondensation of 7-10π conjugated pyrroles
The Investigation of the Cyclocondensation of 7-10π conjugated pyrroles

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

The Role of the Iridium-Nitrogen Interaction in Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation
Transfer hydrogenation is the process of adding hydrogen to a molecule from a non H2 source. This process is more efficient than direct hydrogenation because the non H2 sources are more readily available and inexpensive compared to H2 sources, as well as safer. Many different metal catalyst attached to ligands have been used to determine which is the best for the reaction as well as the most efficient way to get to the end product. Iridium sulfonamides have been shown to be effective transfer hydrogenation catalysts, however the mechanism of transfer hydrogenation is unknown. In this project the interaction of the catalyst with a source of hydrogen, formaldehyde, is investigated using computational chemistry, specifically Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The method of abstraction of hydrogen atoms is investigated in order to determine if hydrogen abstraction is stepwise or concerted, and which orientation of formaldehyde leads to optimal hydrogen abstraction.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

The Synthesis and Characterization of a Functionalized Metal-Ligand Complex, [Co(4-brbpy)3]3+
Cobalt complexes formed from 2,2’-bipyridine (bpy) have been used to study electron transfer mechanisms, facilitate redox reactions in solar cells, and catalyze alkyne reduction reactions. However, relatively few reports present the preparation and use of functionalized cobalt-bpy complexes, particularly those that could be used as reactants for additional chemical synthesis. This poster presents a scheme for the synthesis and characterization of the as-yet unreported functionalized complex [Co(4-brbpy)3]3+ (4-brbpy = 4-bromo-2,2’-bipyridine). The synthesis of this complex follows closely to that previously published for the related complex [Co(4-fbpy)3]3+ (4-fbpy = 4-fluoro-2,2’-bipyridine). Characterization of the synthetic product will be undertaken via nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infrared (IR), and ultraviolet/visible (UV/vis) spectroscopies. The goal of this project is to prepare the target complex and to combine these findings with those obtained from earlier investigations of [Co(bpy)3]3+ to begin developing an understanding of how functionalization of the bpy ligand changes the properties of these complexes. Future experimentation will include the preparation and characterization of additional related complexes with different functionalizations, including isomers of these complexes, with the aim to uncover information about how the type and position of functionalization impacts the chemical and electronic structure of the complexes.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

Unimolecular decomposition and disproportionation-combination rate constant ratios of CHCl2CHCl2 through combination of CHCl2 radicals
In this experiment, dichloroiodomethane was synthesized using sodium iodide and chloroform. An aqueous potassium hydroxide solution was used as a solvent, while 18-crown-6 was used as a catalyst to separate organic and inorganic compounds in the reaction. The reaction was performed at a temperature of 0°C with constant stirring for 2 days. The solution was diluted with excess amount of ice water then separated. A yellow solution was observed and Roto-Vap until the solution turn dark orange. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was used to identify dichloroiodomethane in the solution, while Gas chromatography/Mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to analyze the ratio of chloroform and dichloroiodomethane in the solution. The NMR reading showed that dichloroiodomethane was formed in the reaction. Mass spectrograph also confirmed that dichloroiodomethane was prepared. Based on the NMR reading and mass spectrograph, the reaction produced a sufficient amount of dichloroiodomethane for use in further experiment. Dichloroiodomethane will be look at to determine if a photolysis reaction with mercury (I) iodide is possible to produce two CHCl2 radicals. If the production of the CHCl2 radicals is possible, we will study the formation of CHCl2CHCl2 by combination of the two CHCl2 radicals. Further studies will look at different pathways that CHCl2CHCl2 can undertake when chemically activated. Pathways such as 1,1-HCl elimination and 1,2-HCl elimination will be examined through reaction rate, threshold energies, and product ratio.

Speakers
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Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:30am

Unimolecular reactions of HCFC model systems
Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are greenhouse gases and cause ozone destruction. To stop further ozone depletion, the Montreal Protocol was phase out HCFCs by 2020 for developed countries and 2030 for developing countries. We used CD3CD2CHFCl as a model system to emulate real HCFCs and better understand how they react. By looking at the unimolecular reaction of an energized CD3CD2CHFCl molecule, we can see the different degradation pathways it can take. The kinetic data together with computational results shows that 1,1-HX elimination process (X = Cl, F) can became competitive at higher temperatures with the well known 1,2-HX elimination reactions. By studying these degradation pathways, we can better understand how to destroy these HCFCs or convert them into feedstock for use by chemical industries.

Speakers
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Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

8:40am

The Barker
Finding fun things to do in Asheville is a full-time hunt. Online and real-world sources of event information all offer different limited selections of events, place special concerts on the same level of importance as everyday things like food and drink specials, and miss some large events completely. Several events are scheduled for the same times on the same days. A lot of life is missed this way! The Barker is a centralized web calendar for Asheville. All the town's events are detailed in one place from The Barker website database, separable by event theme, time, proximity or venue. Some of this information is collected from the web, and some is directly contributed by event hosts logging in to the site. The event posting form also warns event schedulers of time conflicts. The Barker is mobile friendly, so this calendar is accessible on the go! Details are on the Highsmith bulletin board, and please report any problems to the feedback form on the site—this functions as product testing. This site is open to the public, and shall be a boon to Asheville businesses.

Moderators
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Wednesday April 26, 2017 8:40am - 9:00am
125 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

9:00am

Arts, People, And Empowerment: The Labor And Love Of Open Hearts Art Center
“Arts, People, and Empowerment: The Labor and Love of Open Hearts Art Center” is an ethnographic field study of Open Hearts Art Center, a nonprofit organization for adults with disabilities in Asheville, North Carolina. Extending from the Fall of 2016 into the late Spring of 2017 this project was inspired and graciously funded by the Fernandes-Friedenberg Award. Methodologically centered on participant observation and interviews, this ethnography explores the cultural structure of this arts-based program through temporal and spatial lenses. In addition I also examine the roles embraced by participants, the relationships between individuals, and the services provided at Open Hearts Art Center to underscore the center’s most important values. These values are (but are not limited to) the human engagement in diverse artistic modalities, the personhood of every individual, and the empowerment of people that social and medical institutions have categorized as “disabled.” The goal of this project is to give a spotlight to the creative and unique lives of the diversely-abled artists that Open Hearts Art Center serves, as well as the staff who passionately foster the exploration and expression of each artist’s identity.

Moderators
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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:00am - 9:20am
237 Zageir Hall

9:00am

Rattana Salee: A Thai Sculptor Who Sheds Light On The Detrimental Effects Of Urbanization
Rattana Salee is a contemporary sculptor from Thailand who received her MFA from Silpakorn University in 2011. This paper offers a visual analysis of her series Shell (Shocked) and an interpretation of her works from a Global Contemporary Art point of view. The body of work grouped together as Shell (Shocked) is mostly abstract and uses metal rods, epoxy, and plaster to offer a juxtaposition of the communal yet private complexities of urban living. Salee’s haunting sculptures mimic the incomplete skeletal structures of urban architecture in Bangkok that were left unfinished after a financial crisis in 1997. While this series offers a commentary on the economic state of Thailand at that particular time, it also suggests a broader social commentary on how people become removed from their surroundings, others, and themselves as a direct result of the increase in urbanization. Shell (Shocked) also speaks to the author of this paper on a more personal level since they are pursuing a BFA in sculpture and their body of work offers a similar social commentary on the formation and development of human identity using mixed media. As such, the paper will provide not only a crucial contribution to the scant amount of scholarship existing on the artist, but it will also contextualize Salee’s work in the 21st century exchange of East and West. This is particularly poignant as Salee is working on a new series that continues a dialogue with and about her city, but uses a more personal and thought-provoking approach.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:00am - 9:20am
102 Owen Hall

9:00am

Testing the Potential Effects of the Non-Native Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata) on Saprotrophic Fungi
Forested ecosystems around the world are becoming increasingly vulnerable to non-indigenous plant invasions. Alliaria petiolata (Bieb.) Cavara & Grande (garlic mustard, Brassicaceae), a naturalized non-native plant species, has successfully invaded woodland habitats across much of the eastern United States because of its highly competitive abilities and the production of allelopathic compounds. The species can limit the growth of native understory species and tree seedling establishment thereby altering community composition and biodiversity by disrupting relationships with various mycorrhizal symbionts. However, the potential adverse effects of garlic mustard allelopathy on saprotrophic fungi has not yet been assessed. We experimentally tested the effects of garlic mustard on growth and fruiting of a widespread saprotrophic fungus, oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus). First year garlic mustard was planted in plastic bins with oyster mushrooms over a 16-week period and were monitored for fruiting body production. We also examined the potential allelopathic effects of garlic mustard on decomposition rates in heavily invaded and uninvaded areas in the Pisgah National Forest of western North Carolina. Twenty pairs of litterbags were placed in the field in April 2015. A random subset of these were retrieved after six months in the field and decomposition rates were calculated from mass lost over time. Under field conditions, we found no significant difference in decomposition between garlic mustard invaded and uninvaded plots. However, there was a nearly significant (p = 0.06) decrease in decomposition with increasing garlic mustard stem density. Decomposition rates may have also been confounded by the abundance of an allelopathic tree species, black walnut (Juglans nigra) as there was a nearly significant decrease in decomposition with increasing species influence (p = 0.073).


Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:00am - 9:20am
038 Karpen Hall

9:00am

Erwin Wifi Map
For the first time in the school’s history, Erwin Middle School is providing each student a laptop. Unfortunately, many students do not have sufficient access to Wifi off-campus. To give students ample opportunity to explore new ideas on the internet, they must have access to it. Our web app, Erwin Wifi Map, allows students from Erwin Middle School to tap into the power of Google Maps to track local Wifi hotspots, save the passwords, and rate hotspots marked on an interactive map. To accomplish the goals of the project, we implement a database using a cloud service to save hotspot and user information. The application uses this database to populate a map within the user’s browser window. This project has been continually tested by the students at Erwin Middle School as well as UNCA and updated as part of an iterative development cycle. The Buncombe County school Board will consider this application as a pilot for other schools in its system.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:00am - 9:20am
125 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

9:00am

Biltmore Blooms: An Economic Impact Analysis of the Biltmore Estate Flower Festival
An economic impact analysis of the Biltmore Estate annual flower festival based on the macroeconomic tools: the multiplier and the impact of autonomous changes in aggregate spending. The project will use these macroeconomic tools on a regional scale in order to successfully conduct an economic impact analysis. This will answer the question of what impact the Biltmore Flower Festival has on total spending in Asheville’s economy. My motivation behind this project is my interest in how businesses and events affect economies on a regional scale. This analysis will be a useful tool to measure changes in Asheville’s economy. The results of this analysis could be useful for businesses to show that their event is profitable and can be used to argue for things like tax concessions, asking city to improve nearby roads, and to raise general support from the public and the government.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:00am - 9:20am
035 Karpen Hall

9:00am

Trash Rises: Finding Beauty Growing Up As White Trash
My research demonstrates that the novel Bastard out of Carolina is a novel of formation, i.e. Bildungsroman. I will argue that the novel’s concepts of aesthetic beauty inform the development of the main character, Bone, as she comes of age. Many scholars who write on this novel focus on the themes of illegitimacy, shame, stereotypes of poor whites, and sexual violence. My thesis adds a different nuance to the conversations around the novel, showing how aesthetic beauty informs a young girl’s coming of age story and creating a new thread of thought to add to the existing discourse that is currently being weaved. Bastard out of Carolina tells a story stained with the misery and depravity that follows poverty, abuse, and shame. The darkness and despair of the novel is interspersed with images of hope, familial love, and resilience that serve to combat the desolate setting of the novel. Bone’s perseverance and ultimate survival depend in many ways on her growing sensibilities surrounding her place in the world, sensibilities informed in part through her developing understanding of beauty. As a literary genre, the Bildungsroman explicates the lives of individuals who are coming of age and entering society. However, as a genre it is male centric and has a contested critical tradition. Bastard out of Carolina stretches the bounds of the genre and helps readers reexamine the genre. In the world of the novel certain forms of beauty are privileged while others are marginalized. Bone is shown by society what beauty is deemed to be, but finds beauty in marginalized forms. Her sense of beauty, and her sense of self, is informed by society but is reshaped as she re-examines and re-conceptualizes beauty.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:00am - 9:20am
232 Karpen Hall

9:00am

Reptile And Amphibian Monitoring At Sandy Bottom Preserve
The southern Appalachian Mountains are an exceptionally biodiverse region with the highest globally for salamander species. However, many of these species are endangered, threatened, or of special concern, with habitat loss being a major contributor to population declines. Sandy Bottom Preserve is a wetland complex in the French Broad River floodplain near Asheville, North Carolina. A survey of reptile and amphibian populations at this site has not been taken since 2004, therefore the objective of this research is to establish a current herpfauna inventory. This sensitive habitat is a known location for amphibian species of special concern including mole salamanders (Ambystoma talpoideum) and four-toed salamanders (Hemidactylum scutatum), and it serves as a breeding site for many others. There are also historical records for the presence of bog turtles (Glyptemys muhlenbergii), a federally threatened species. North Carolina Wildlife Resource Commission personnel have conveyed concern regarding the potential widening of Highway 191, which separates Sandy Bottom from the French Broad River. The development of this road could impact local herpfauna populations. Therefore, establishment of an updated, systematically obtained record of diversity is critical before construction is proposed. Methods of data collection include the use of drift fences with pitfall traps and coverboards, both common and effective tools used in ecological monitoring. The monitoring schedule is largely dependent on weather conditions, with pitfall traps opened and checked every 24 hours during rain events and cover boards checked a minimum of 6 times per month. The study period spans from September 2016 to March 2017. This research will provide an updated inventory of herpfauna in this ecosystem for the monitoring of rare or threatened species and those at the edge of their known ranges.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:00am - 9:20am
103 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

9:00am

Contraceptive Counseling Among Female College Student
Despite a plethora of research about contraceptive safety and efficacy in the United States, little is known about how contraceptive counseling affects patient experience and contraceptive use. Contraceptive counseling is the time when a provider discusses contraceptive methods with their client. The aims of this study are to investigate whether perceived quality of contraceptive counseling and perceived bias from providers are associated with satisfaction, choice, and continuation of a patient’s contraceptive method among college-aged women.  This study is a cross-sectional survey of college students.  The methods of this study included an anonymous survey administered to 200 students across 18 sections of Humanities classes that include students from all disciplines and years, at a small liberal arts college in the Southeast United States. The questionnaire included both closed- and open-ended questions regarding perceived bias, what kind of contraceptive counseling they received, how satisfied and willing to continue their current contraceptive method they are, and questions about their sex and self-identified gender.  Quantitative data were analyzed for female individuals who have received contraceptive counseling. Participants who were “very satisfied” with their contraceptive counseling, 93.55% of participants were either “very satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied” with their current contraceptive method (n=146). The Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.3892 (p


Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:00am - 9:20am
406 Wilma Sherrill Center

9:00am

Exploring Gendered Leadership Styles
Women rarely occupied management positions prior to the end of the 20th century. An increase in educational attainment, access to birth control, and removal of structured barriers built on gender norms improved women’s overall accessibility to leadership positions. While women make up 51.5% of all management/professional positions, this is not reflected in male-dominated industries. For example, according to 2017 Catalyst data, women hold only 4.4% of CEO positions in the aggregate of Fortune 500 companies. Male dominated industries traditionally require physical strength, working outdoors, and STEM degrees and certifications. Female dominated industries are traditionally “caring” fields such as education and health care. The leadership styles associated with men and women differ based on societal socialization of gender norms that impact perceptions of gender identity. For example, men are stereotypically viewed as dominant and independent while women are viewed as supportive team builders. Gender performativity is this project’s point of focus. Performativity of gender is the repetition of actions based off an individual’s dominant conventions. This study explores how women approach leadership in fields dominated by men through analyzing their performances and reflecting on characteristics that are stereotypical to men and women. Applying feminist theories surrounding gender performativity and gender norm construction, I will analyze each participant’s leadership style based off their perceptions and experiences in a traditionally male dominated workplace.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:00am - 9:20am
229 Owen Hall

9:00am

Environmental Communication: The Procedural Process In Which Environmental Issues Are Communicated To North Carolina Students
This research is an examination of environmental communication in the educational system in Asheville City Schools and Buncombe County Schools. The study seeks to identify how environmental issues are communicated and articulated to students, including the procedure and resources utilized in disseminating information. This study also examines whether schools in low-income and predominately minority areas are prioritized as much as those in high-income, predominately white areas. In-depth interviews were conducted with environmental educators and professionals to identify the strategies and the resources needed to implement environmental issues campaigns. This study broadens the literature on the education of environmental issues within K-12 schools.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:00am - 9:20am
016 Karpen Hall

9:00am

Moody Blues: The Paradox Of Listening To Sad Music
It’s not clear whether people do listen to sad music to increase their sad mood. Research has suggested that it can increase the psychological benefit of an improved mood. For many years amongst researchers the question of why people listen to sad music has always been striking. Research on this subject began with Aristotle. Listening to sad music presents a paradox since real life sadness causes depression, seclusion and withdrawal from the real world. Sadness in nostalgic context and experience does, however, present a feeling individuals actively seek and desire. People with high tendencies toward reflectiveness (the ability to self reflect) may find sad music to be a tool to process negative feelings. When in a negative mood, listeners seek music that matches their mood for mood regulatory purposes. Other listeners with strong tendencies of absorption (the capacity to become deeply task oriented), may be able to enjoy the emotional state of sad music without the sometimes accompanied sad experience. It is not, however, determined whether the goals for listening to sad music match the outcomes. In the research presented here, I intend to find out why people listen to sad music. I will begin by conducting research as to why people listen to this kind of music and the outcomes wish to receive by doing so. I will then discuss the ideas of aesthetics and how it relates to my research. I hypothesize that sad music produces an improved mood, which is then associated with experience and nostalgia. I hope to find that sad music improves ones mood rather than saddens it.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:00am - 9:20am
012 Karpen Hall

9:00am

History Of Jazz Recordings: 100 Songs In 100 Years
History of Jazz Recordings: 100 Songs in 100 Years is a research project that aims to represent the rich, complex history of jazz around the globe through recordings. In effort to tell history through a more diverse lens, I have selected recordings by one hundred different artists that represent a wide spectrum of race, age, gender, sexuality, nationality, and musical styles. The topic has evolved into a book that I have begun writing as part of my undergraduate research project. In this presentation, I will explain my methodology and approach to artist and song selection and display many of the pages along with musical examples. I will also present themes in popular jazz history texts, express the problem with the lack of diversity in many history narratives, and highlight genres and people that have historically been minimized. In my book, female musicians, jazz-rock fusion, Latin, European jazz, and modern jazz are presented as part of the main narrative, rather than as a footnote. I attempt to give each style and era equal weight, covering recordings made from 1917-2017. Each page covers one artist or ensemble and provides a brief biography, cultural background, and an analysis of the musical significance of the selected recording. This method of presentation allows readers better understand the diverse tapestry of musicians that come together to create the history of jazz.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:00am - 9:20am
018 Lipinsky

9:00am

Video Games, Investment, And Empathy
Approx. 50% of Americans play video games regularly. With the advent of the smart phone, this medium is becoming more widely consumed, and with the gaming industry raking in millions worldwide understanding what makes games different from other forms of media is becoming increasingly important. How does the interactive aspect of video games make them different? How do we connect, as human beings, with this media differently than others? This study evaluates the impact of interactivity of games with empathy response and investment in the stories they tell. Can video games, by the very nature of their interactivity, make us connect more with the characters within? Do we naturally feel more invested in video games due to the effort put into playing them? Participants in this study were randomly assigned to two groups, blocking for both gender and previous gaming experience. Group A played the videogame “Undertale”, while Group B watched it being played on youtube. Questionnaires about the participants feelings about certain characters were recorded, asking on a scale of 1-10 how much they empathized with certain characters and how much they liked them. Questions were added to the questionnaires, after playing or watching the game, how the participant would feel if the character also felt a certain way. Play/watching time was recorded. Stronger responses on the scale and longer play/watch time were measures of investment, while strong responses and longer answers to the empathy questions were measures of empathy response.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:00am - 9:20am
102 Carmichael

9:00am

“It Gets Better, Doesn’t It?” An Investigation Of Transgender Individuals’ Reactions To Transphobic Acts
Acts of discrimination and aggression based on transphobia are an ongoing problem today in the United States. Transgender youth experience these acts in a variety of ways, and while their responses are sometimes harmful to themselves, they may also respond with resilience and determination. This project is an attempt to show how transgender adults have responded to the hatred they faced in their youth and what resources they believe should be available to help their community deal with hatred against them. This study consists of an analysis of semi-structured retrospective interviews with ten adult transgender individuals exploring their lives as teenagers.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:00am - 9:20am
236 Zageir Hall

9:00am

Familial Relationships As Site For Feminist Activism: An Oral History Project
Familial relationships have the power to enlighten us about the past and provide us with vision for the future, both of which are important aspects of social movements. This oral history research project focuses on the voices of local individuals. In particular, I am working to understand more deeply how people have engaged in feminist conversation, confrontation, and activism with their families. This project is locating familial relationships as a site for feminist resistance and solidarity, with the aim of discovering what enables and alters the continuance of feminism and feminist ideals from generation to generation. The primary definition of feminism I will be using is the belief in the equality of all people regardless of gender, race, class, orientation, ability, age, etc. along with any self-guided notions and definitions provided by participants. The participants will be local Asheville residents, the majority of which will be UNCA students and their families due to the person to person solicitation sample. I hope to incorporate as much diversity into the study as possible by seeking participants of different backgrounds and demographics. The methods that will be utilized are unstructured in-depth interviews and oral histories. This is in order to get thorough qualitative information and to create the greatest understanding possible. The true goal is to highlight the voices of local people and to listen to their stories. The interviews obtained will likely show how families can encourage and also complicate an individual’s understanding and adoption of feminism and their identity.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:00am - 9:20am
206 Karpen Hall

9:00am

Parallel Development Of Autonomous Robots With A Focus On Modularity
The SoutheastCon conference, hosted annually by region three of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), invites students to engage in academic competitions at a collegiate level. As a way of representing the skills taught at the University of North Carolina at Asheville, a team of mechatronics engineering students participates most years in the Hardware Competition. For the 2017 competition, students were challenged to design and fabricate one or more autonomous robots that would navigate on a four foot by eight foot game board and complete four stages in under four minutes. Each stage required the completion of several unique electrical, mechanical, and computing tasks. In order to minimize the time required to complete the challenge, it was decided to develop a robot for each stage. The robots were designed to be modular, incorporating an interchangeable chassis to simplify the design and fabrication process. Since the completion of some stages was dependent on information from other stages, the robots were wired and programmed to send pertinent information to one another using a serial peripheral interface bus. Parallel development proved to be an efficient way to distribute the workload between team members, and modular design provided a suitable environment for rapid development. Furthermore, this approach allowed sub-teams to easily change their design without delaying or affecting the final project deadline.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:00am - 9:25am
417 Mountain View Room, Wilma Sherrill Center

9:20am

Developing Relationship With The Christine W. Avery Learning Center
The Christine W. Avery Learning Center is an after school care facility and enrichment program. Students from Asheville City Schools, Buncombe County Schools, and local charter schools are bussed to the program, located in the Fellowship Hall of Hill Street Baptist Church, Mondays through Fridays. This research project focuses on the change in relationship and progress at the center as a fully-immersed mentor versus my previous semester as a mentor who was going through the motions to complete hours. I will compare field site notes from my previous semester to this semester’s notes, collecting information through participant observation. This project seeks to demonstrate that mentoring can be a service-learning practice, as opposed to volunteering, if the mentor is fully engaged and applying the experience to their educational path.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:20am - 9:40am
237 Zageir Hall

9:20am

The Paintings Of Taysir Sharaf: A Contribution To And Documentation Of Palestinian Culture
The Palestinian artist Taysir Sharaf was active from 1967 until his death in 2001, maintaining an active career for over 25 years. During this time, he produced over 500 original works and distinguished himself amongst artists of Palestine. Despite his prolific career and numerous successful exhibitions, limited research has been produced concerning his life and work. This paper will discuss the artist in the context of Palestinian and Global Art communities. His works Jerusalem (1979) and Only God is Victorious (1998) are particularly helpful in the examination of Sharaf’s career. They showcase how the artist’s representations of Jerusalem both documented and contributed to the culture of a nation during conflict and transition. This paper will be examining these works which he produced during the occupation of Palestine. It will elaborate on his use of painting to cope with the sadness and sense of defeat that accompanied the occupation of his hometown. Artistic reactions to conflict leave a mark on the history and culture of the region. This contribution will shed new light on the current conversation surrounding conflict in this region.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:20am - 9:40am
102 Owen Hall

9:20am

Indoor Cultivation Of Piptoporus Betulinus (Bull. Ex Fr.) (Birch Polypore) P. Karst. On Nitrogen Enriched Betula Sp. Substrate
Birch polypore (Piptoporus betulinus) has been used medicinally by many cultures for centuries. Recently, compounds extracted from this fungus have been shown to have anticancer activities, prompting an interest in cultivation. However, birch polypore only fruits seasonally and is difficult to cultivate, with only one study describing indoor cultivation success. Improving indoor cultivation techniques will allow for greater harvests increasing the production of medicinal compounds for medicinal research. My research was designed to refine the current indoor cultivation method developed in Poland to improve the biological efficiency (amount of fruit biomass per unit substrate), by manipulating levels of nitrogen supplementation to the substrate. Several specimens of birch polypore were collected in November 2016 in Pisgah NF. Cultures were created by excising pieces of internal tissue and transferring them onto malt extract agar medium plates. Once fully colonized, kernel size portions of cultures were transferred into bags containing sterilized rye grain to create inoculum. For each replicate 0.7 kg of kiln-dried birch (Betula sp.) sawdust and chips substrate will be mixed with conditioning materials (dolomite, gypsum and sucrose) and placed in microporous-filtered polypropylene bags. Bags will be assigned to nitrogen supplement (a mix of 60% rice bran, 20% soy powder and 20% rye flour) treatment of 0%, 10%, 25% and 50% of substrate dry mass with 5 replicates for each treatment. After autoclaving, each bag will then be inoculated with 20 grams of inoculum, sealed and placed in constant temperature (25oC) growth chambers. Once bags demonstrate thorough mycelium development, they will be cold shocked (2–4 °C for 48 hours). Upon reaching maturity the fruiting bodies will be harvested, dried, and weighed to determine biological efficiency. I predict increasing biological efficiency in fruiting body production with increasing nitrogen additions and predict biological efficiencies greater than 16% at the highest level.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:20am - 9:40am
038 Karpen Hall

9:20am

Easy Booking
Over 1 million people board domestic flights every day in the US. In booking their flights online, many of these people find navigating airline's websites frustrating and difficult. To reduce frustration, our web app, "Easy Booking", provides a user interface that makes booking flights very quick and easy. This app handles everything from filtering and selecting flights to selecting seats and buying tickets. Frequent flyers who book flights weekly or tech novices who desire a simple method in flight reservations will find this program invaluable.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:20am - 9:40am
125 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

9:20am

The Shift From Home To Market Production In North Carolina
Is the apparent rapid growth in real GDP that occurred in the United States during the 1950s to the 1980s an illusion? One of the limitations of national income accounting is that nonmarket production is excluded. This research answers the question: was the relatively rapid rate of GDP growth in the United States a consequence of a shift from what was once produced in the home to market transactions? Home cooked meals became restaurant meals, yard work became landscaping services, and child care became daycare. I will document when the transition occurred through oral historical accounts, and I will adjust official GDP statistics to demonstrate the effect this transition had on measured GDP.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:20am - 9:40am
035 Karpen Hall

9:20am

The Search For Identity: Narrative Projection In The Works Of Edgar Allan Poe
My thesis will examine character doubles in “The Tell-Tale Heart” and “The Cask of Amontillado” as a way for individuals to critically question the reality in which they exist. This then leads to a deeper understanding of the world within which the reader interacts daily. When analyzed through a psychoanalytic perspective, both stories provide insight in regard to how narrators construct a second reality in order to then destroy it. Thus, I argue that the narrators of both stories establish character doubles in order to project their undesirable traits onto the characters as a means of revival for the narrators themselves. This project will explore the social and political implications of doubling as a means of catharsis for both the narrators, the reader, and Poe himself. Examining Poe’s work through a psychoanalytic lens reveals his intention for the reader to think critically and live in a state of perpetual questioning. I will consider how questioning the status quo results in a constantly changing paradigm of the reader’s place in society, which then leads to the reader being able to view and overcome societal norms in an innovative manner.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:20am - 9:40am
232 Karpen Hall

9:20am

The Effect Of Beneficial Soil Microbes On Seed Germination
Exotic invasive species are one of the major obstacles to effective and efficient landscape management. Historical methods have proven to be costly and can sometimes lead to unanticipated environmental consequences. Current practices for weed control do not always target and kill the desired amount of weed seedlings. In addition, there is a growing need amongst organic farmers for organic pesticides as synthetic pesticides are forbidden. The scientific literature indicates there is potential for the use of beneficial soil microorganisms (BSM) as a method of weed control for land management. The goal of this research was to quantify the effect of BSM on Fagopyrum esculentum (Japanese buckwheat) over a range of concentrations and soak times. The experimental design included combinations of 4 BSM concentration levels (plus control) and 4 soak times each replicated 3 times for total of 48 replicates. Variables controlled for included BSM concentration, soak time, temperature and light. We hypothesize that BSM will increase the rate of germination to a threshold point after which the F. esculentum would die. Effects were quantified through measures of dry-weight biomass (one word), terminal plant height, seed viability testing, and germination counts.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:20am - 9:40am
103 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

9:20am

The Effects Of Coloring On Stress
Adult Coloring books are a popular trend in today’s pop culture. Although coloring books are commonly thought to have positive effects on one’s anxiety and stress levels, little research exists to support these claims. Muthard & Gilbertson (2016) evaluated the “effectiveness of mandala coloring paired with focused breathing in reducing negative affect, state anxiety, and psychophysiological stress response following a psychosocial stressor” (p16). Findings indicated a modest positive effect on stress after coloring mandalas in combination with mindful breathing. Researchers suggested several modifications for future research including: having a task for the control group; independently assessing the effects of mindful breathing on participants. The present research will examine how coloring affects one’s stress levels, using two experimental groups (a coloring group and a mindful breathing group) and one active control group (transcribing a paragraph). Researchers will evaluate stress levels through a self-reported pre and post stress level survey and pre and post assessment of physiological responses. Using these results researchers will look at the independent effects of coloring on one’s stress as compared to mindful breathing and an active control task.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:20am - 9:40am
406 Wilma Sherrill Center

9:20am

Analyzing Future Declines In The Chinese Workforce And The Implications
China is currently facing a dilemma as an aging workforce coupled with declining birth rates shrinks their viable labor pool. Workforce losses such as 2014-2015’s loss of 4.87 million workers has forced a close examination of the issues that resulted in the declining workforce and the options available to the Chinese government to avoid further declination in their labor force. By analyzing the most prominent solutions put forward by both the Chinese government and external researchers, this study will attempt to assess the viability of each option. This will be accomplished by looking at each solution in how they approach the historical causes for the issue, the practicality of implementation for the Chinese government, and any other cultural or ideological issues that may be barriers when enacting proposed solutions. The goal of this project is to analyze the available research and determine any data driven policy solutions.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:20am - 9:40am
229 Owen Hall

9:20am

Storytelling: The New Language Of Environmental Advocacy
With the recent development of affordable technology, content creation is more accessible than ever. It has never been easier than now to share one's voice and story with the world. This essay explores how creative non-fiction storytelling has evolved into the new method of strategic communications. Specifically, it studies how a local environmental organization, Dogwood Alliance, is utilizing this method of communication to advance their mission of forest conservation. The research will first explain how climate change and other disturbances are putting our forests at risk, and what the consequences of this damage will be. It will then shift into the history of storytelling and its cultural significance, past and present. Within this, the essay explores the psychological link to storytelling as a subtle way to influence people into supporting a cause, and if this is a more effective method to positively motivate change amongst the masses in an already overwhelmingly pessimistic era.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:20am - 9:40am
016 Karpen Hall

9:20am

The Death Of Social Email: A Study
In this paper, I will discuss how millennials are shifting email usage from its inception. I will show that email usage in its origin included socialization, but as technology advances, so do means of communication. After reviewing multiple studies about email and internet usage, I have concluded that email as a social tool is becoming less prominent than other forms of electronic communication. I hypothesize that millennials are shifting toward other forms of electronic communication, such as social media or text messaging, instead of email as a social tool. Through a study of millennial age students’ inboxes, I collected data to find out how they are using email as a communication tool. In order to find out how they are using email, students will sort their email messages into categories, as well as answer questions pertaining to their personal background and their electronic communication. I will then tabulate the social function of student email. Through this procedure, I hope to give insight into the use of email by millennials. In conclusion, this study will examine the email content of millennials in order to better understand how they are communicating electronically.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:20am - 9:40am
012 Karpen Hall

9:20am

Social And Environmental Factors That Contribute To Increased Time In Nature
Current research makes clear that Americans spend the vast majority of their lives indoors. Although being indoors is safe and comfortable, research shows that people experience numerous benefits from spending time outside in nature. The present study seeks to identify the personal, social and environmental factors that influence people’s decisions to spend time in nature or natural/outdoor settings. An original survey was developed and will be distributed to a group of undergraduate students. The survey was designed to measure personal, social and environmental factors that contribute to a person’s choice to spend time outside in nature. The present study hypothesizes that the survey will reveal positive associations between time spent in nature and, more generally outside, and factors such as friend’s time in nature, experience with nature/outdoors, and activity level. Conversely, we also predict that people with negative perceptions of nature (i.e. a fear or disgust of nature) will be found to spend less time outside in nature. Therefore, if this study can help to identify which personal and environmental factors are correlated with a person spending more time in nature then future research will be in a better position to understand how to promote the value of spending time outside. The results of the present study will also be discussed in the context of the research on the physical and psychological benefits of spending time outside as well as a corresponding increased inclination towards making environmentally conscious decisions.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:20am - 9:40am
102 Carmichael

9:20am

Teacher Perspectives On Dealing With Educational Disparities
Many children are impacted by factors that hinder their ability to learn. In the classroom, teachers see those factor in a more personal way because they experience the child as a whole human rather than testable components. While many studies discuss education inequality, teachers on the ground have often been overlooked. This study examines the perceptions of current teachers about educational disparities and how they manage it in the classroom. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten teachers ranging from kindergarten to high school in the Erwin District in Buncombe County, North Carolina in the spring of 2017.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:20am - 9:40am
236 Zageir Hall

9:20am

The Cost Of Representation
The focus of this project is to analyze stereotypes within mainstream queer films. Mainstream films often portray stereotypes which raise the question of whether or not representation at any cost is beneficial to a specific community. Common themes and stereotypes used in these films will be discussed along with how they affect the queer community. Lisa Cholodenko’s 2010 film, “The Kids are Alright” brings light to some of these themes, such as bisexual-erasure. The cost of representation will be brought into question while weighing the pros and cons of queer representation in the mainstream.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:20am - 9:40am
221 Karpen Hall

9:20am

A Feminist Approach To Improving Sex Education
Planned Parenthood cites that “only 10 states and the District of Columbia require that sex education programs include teaching about birth control,” and most teachers in NC are given little to no professional development or preparation for leading sex education classes. A 2008 University of Washington study shows that “teenagers who received comprehensive sex education were 60% less likely to get pregnant than someone who received abstinence-only education.” I consider comprehensive sex education to move us beyond abstinence-only and to encompass a range of topics including but not limited to: basic human anatomy, information on and the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases/infections, how pregnancy affects the body, what types of contraception are available and how they function, what defines a healthy relationship, and what defines rape/sexual assault. Drawing upon anonymous survey research and recent scholarship, this undergraduate research presentation will address the types of information missing/lacking in abstinence-only models of sex education, and I will propose improvements to the current system. Research data includes qualitative responses about the experiences of adults and what they learned in school or by their parents in terms of sex education. The results of the survey shed light on what information people want included in future sex education curriculums. The end goal for this research, which I hope to share with the audience during my presentation, is to produce a handbook for North Carolina teachers that will include a comprehensive approach to sex and sexuality, so that future generations will learn valuable information that they can use for the rest of their lives.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:20am - 9:40am
206 Karpen Hall

9:25am

UNC Asheville Charging Station (Montañas Del Sol)
The workload that many students undertake prevents them from getting outside into the sunlight and fresh air. Laptops tether students to an electrical outlet because technology is required to complete most homework. This means studying outside is rare and short lived. In 2014, the American Psychological Association reported an approximated one half of college students suffered from anxiety and roughly one third from depression[2]. These percentages have risen steadily since 2010, as have the number of college students who have considered suicide. Stress and depression can decrease with an increase of fresh air and sunlight, thus increasing Vitamin D. Studies have shown that Vitamin D can help lessen the feeling of depression, and some suggest that sunlight can even increase cognitive thought[1]. Getting outside and into the sunlight is proving to be a real need for college students. Taking all of this into consideration, we have designed and developed a scaled solar-powered mobile charging station that creates a way for students to be productive outside while receiving the benefits of sunlight and fresh air. The project provides a power source for laptops and phones and combines design with engineering. Artistic form coupled with well-engineered function and sustainability provide a stress-reducing environment in which technology-bound students can work.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:25am - 9:50am
417 Mountain View Room, Wilma Sherrill Center

9:40am

Between The Scenes: Forensic Encounters
From fingerprints to eye witness accounts the Asheville Forensic Service Technicians use each piece of evidence they find to recreate the story of a crime scene. In the process of piecing together a crime where an unknown suspect has disturbed the lives of innocents, testimonies become a vital resource. The relationships and constructed performances between forensic technicians, sworn officers, and victims or witnesses interplay with one another and create a balance of trust and truth against the uncertainty of suspicion and lies. These relationships can be fragile but they work together to create a foundation for successfully processing a scene. This research analyzes the importance of witness testimony and police cooperation with forensic technicians. Each entity has a specific role, and since no two crime scenes are the same each entity must constantly adapt and navigate new relationships. The interactions that are constructed between the authority figures and civilians who come into contact with each other help to establish direction for forensic technicians. Questions arise about the reliability of witness and victim testimony as well as the phenomena of lying. How then do investigators manage the information that is given to them when they are not the first presence to arrive at a scene? What would compel a witness or victim to lie about or exaggerate the facts of a crime? These are questions that have been examined from the ethnographic perspective of participant observation, interview sessions, and a thorough study of forensic methods.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:40am - 10:00am
237 Zageir Hall

9:40am

Yazan Khalili: The Anatomy Of Borders
Yazan Khalili is an artist and former architect from Palestine who currently resides in the notoriously contentious West Bank. His most well-known works use the medium of photography, drawing, and digital manipulation to discuss the issue of the Palestinian-Israeli relationship through the various contexts of this region. Motivated by his own experiences as both an architect and a Palestinian, Yazan illustrates the ever changing landscape of the West Bank, especially as it is altered through militia enforced Israeli settlements and the use of checkpoints. Common themes of his work include the politics of geography, the social and political implications of borders, and challenging the perceptions of photography as a political tool. The following is a discussion of several bodies of work by Khalili that deal primarily with the artist’s personal relationship to the unstable physiography of Palestine. This paper will also discuss the evolution of his artistic practices while providing context of the political situation that influences it, thus making a crucial contribution to the dearth of scholarly publications on his oeuvre. As one of the few accessible Palestinian artists who works from the nucleus of the Israel-Palestine conflict, Khalili’s work is providing an aperture to look through that has remained, otherwise, unseen in the Western understanding of this crisis.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:40am - 10:00am
102 Owen Hall

9:40am

Mutating A Gα13 Phosphorylation Site To Determine Its Role In Cell Growth Signaling
The Gα12/Gα13 subfamily of trimeric G proteins are implicated in various physiological processes and disease states, including tumorigenesis. These proteins reside in the cytoplasm and transmit information from membrane-bound receptors to the cell interior. Earlier studies suggest Gα13 is phosphorylated on a threonine side chain at position 203 within the 377-amino acid protein. In this project I focused on this specific threonine, mutating it to mimic the phosphorylated and dephosphorylated states by creating negatively charged and hydrophobic substitutions, respectively. Using directed PCR-based mutagenesis, Thr-203 was converted to glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and alanine in three separate DNA constructs, which were then expressed in human kidney cells. These Gα13 mutants were tested for protein binding through pull-down experiments, gel electrophoresis, and immunoblotting. Preliminary results suggest that these mutations disrupt binding to multiple RhoGEFs and these disruptions may be selective to each mutant. These mutants were also tested for ability to stimulate SRE-mediated transcription, a cell growth pathway linked to cancer. The alanine-substituted Gα13 showed a sharp decrease in ability to drive this response. Because this threonine is conserved in Gα12, I am currently generating similar mutants in this protein to examine effects on its protein binding and signaling properties.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:40am - 10:00am
038 Karpen Hall

9:40am

Handwriting Helper
Handwriting Helper aids children in developing and practicing legible handwriting. Many schools in the United States are taking out certain curriculum like cursive. In this learning application, young users practice their handwriting skills using a capacitive stylus. Initially, one will see how to write a cursive lowercase letter, and then will be able to trace over that letter with their stylus. The application will then score the learner for correctness, using mathematical algorithms for comparisons. The Sublime text editor and the Corona SDK, which is a multi-platform framework using the Lua scripting language, are tools for Handwriting Helper. Being multi-platformed, the application will be on Android, iOS, and other mobile devices. Initial unit testing for this application insured that the scenes from one to the next ran properly and smoothly, testing particular events, listeners and transitions. User and stakeholder testing during the final stages of development insured that the application was user friendly, with a survey for all testers to give feedback and opinions on the user interface.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:40am - 10:00am
125 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

9:40am

An Examination Of The Relationship Between State-Perpetrated Repression, Total Fertility Rates, And Economic Growth
An analysis examining the relationship between state-perpetrated repression, economic growth, and total fertility rates. Total fertility rates vary across the world for a number of reasons. The level of state-perpetrated human rights violations also vary and may influence total fertility rate. Existing models of fertility can be modified by including state-perpetrated repression as a determinant of fertility. Ordinary least squares regression analysis will be used on panel data to examine data on multiple countries over a 10 year time period. By classifying countries by wealth, the relationship between state-perpetrated repression, economic growth, and total fertility rates will be made clear and will allow for a more complete understanding of overall population growth patterns.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:40am - 10:00am
035 Karpen Hall

9:40am

Demanding And Unavoidable: Empathy In Chinua Achebe’s First Two Novels
Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart (1958) and No Longer at Ease (1960) serve as before and after comparisons of 20th century British colonization efforts in Nigeria. Things Fall Apart displays the events surrounding the very first European contact in Nigeria. No Longer at Ease provides the outcomes of the first contact and reveals the effects of the takeover. These two novels feature four generations of men: Unoka, Okonkwo, Isaac/Nwoye, and Obi and allow an observation of precisely how one spotlighted family is affected by colonization. I argue that these works provide readers with a more personal example of strife caused by colonization, thus allowing them to relate to and care about these men—therefore experiencing emotional discomfort on behalf of and empathy for the colonized. It is Achebe’s agenda and authorial intent that I intend to identify with scholarly critiques of his work and his own reflections. Achebe forces readers to observe the drastic and fluid changes brought on by imperialistic triumph and see that the colonizers did not create a wave of oppression then leave it behind; they kept the waves coming. Furthermore, readers are witness to four men of the same patrilineage and observe how they change—or don’t change—with the colonization and forced progression of their society. My thesis illuminates and analyzes Achebe’s effort to accurately and fairly represent the plight of the colonized and provide a voice for the voiceless.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:40am - 10:00am
232 Karpen Hall

9:40am

Comparing Mean %EPT, Mean FBIBI, And Functional Feeding Groups Of Aquatic Macroinvertebrates From Disturbed And Undisturbed Sites Within The Flat Brook Watershed In Northern New Jersey
There is growing concern for the health of the world’s freshwaters, and bioassessment is often used as a water quality monitoring tool under the Clean Water Act. I used the Surber sampler method to collect aquatic macroinvertebrates from disturbed and undisturbed locations within the Flat Brook watershed in northern New Jersey, USA. %EPT, FBIBI, and functional feeding groups were compared to suggest the overall water quality of each location. Results were not statistically significant; but overall high %EPT and excellent FBIBI values suggest high quality waters within the Flat Brook watershed. These positive ecological results indicate the need to preserve the pristine state of the Flat Brook watershed.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:40am - 10:00am
103 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

9:40am

Correlation Of Gender And Product Advertising: How Does Our Gender Identity Affect Our Perceptions Of Advertising?
In this paper, I seek to analysis the intersection of gender and product advertising. I will look at past research in gender studies, group identification, and consumer perceptions of advertisements. Then I will survey University of North Carolina Asheville students on their perceptions of the “genderness” of a family of beverage products (the product of my survey). For each advertisement each respondent will evaluate the ad on a scale of 0 to 3 (0 = feminine and 3= masculine) and ask them to assess the ad on its “genderness”. I will also ask the respondents how likely they would be to buy the product based on the advertisement provided. The last question will be evaluated on a 6-point Likert scale. I hope to demonstrate a correlation between our personal gender identity, the perceived genderness of product advertisements, and our willingness to buy that product.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:40am - 10:00am
012 Karpen Hall

9:40am

The Impact Of Feral And Free-Roaming Animals: How Social Media Can Help
This study examines the environmental impacts of stray and neglected animals and the effect social media can have on improving the issue. Feral and stray animals can cause rapid declines in native wildlife, spread disease to humans and other animals, and have effects on the gene pool of native wildlife by interbreeding. This study seeks to identify the effectiveness of popular hashtags and social media campaigns such as #tnr (trap, neuter, return) on minimizing the issue. Articles and studies regarding feral animals and their environmental impacts were analyzed, people in the field were interviewed, and social media hashtags were measured using online analytics. This study broadens the literature on the environmental impacts of feral, stray and free-roaming animals and how social media can be used to combat this issue.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:40am - 10:00am
016 Karpen Hall

9:40am

Drink Up: A closer look at cognitive factors and their relationship with habit and behavior change in the context of drinking water for improved health in emerging adults
This study examines the connection between executive function (EF) and understood factors related to behavior change, i.e., self-efficacy and motivation. Participants were expected to change drinking habits by drinking more water. It was hypothesized that water intake would increase over 90 days, and that there would be a positive relationship between EF scores and successful behavior change. We predicted that it would be easier to exhibit the desired behavior and create “healthy habits” if one tracked progress daily, set goals, reported higher motivation, and was presented with comprehensive information. At time 1, all participants (n=33, aged 18-25) received a water bottle and completed a battery of habit (motivation for change, readiness to change-RTC) questionnaires and EF tasks (stroop, go-nogo task, running span, trail-making, verbal fluency). The treatment group (n=16) set goals, tracked, and reported daily water consumption with a free smartphone app, and were presented with information on healthy water drinking. The control group (n=10) did not track water intake or learn about benefits of drinking water. All participants returned in 90 days for repeated-measures testing. Correlational analysis determined that mean water intake differed statistically significantly between time points, and post hoc tests revealed a significant negative correlation in water intake between month 2 and month 3 for the treatment group. Water intake did not consistently increase over time. At time 2 (n=15) inhibition scores were marginally negatively correlated with total water intake; this negates the hypothesis that better inhibitory skills may lead to more successful control of personal behaviors. At time 1, intention to change was marginally negatively correlated with total water intake, and was also negatively correlated with total water intake at time 2. This negates the hypothesis that greater motivation to change is consistently correlated with long-term successful behavior changes.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:40am - 10:00am
102 Carmichael

9:40am

Comment Below: Racialized Perceptions Of Women’s Music Videos On Youtube
An emerging body of scholarship seeks to understand the ways that the internet shapes and fosters social processes, but much remains to be discovered about online interaction. Few studies have examined how online interaction might differ according to social categories such as race and gender. Comment sections of highly trafficked websites like YouTube remain underexamined but may provide useful insight into the ways people interact and share ideas publicly online. This research addresses the question of how popular female artists are differently received according to their race in the comment section of YouTube. Using a content analysis of YouTube comments posted under the most popular women’s music videos in spring of 2017, this study sheds light on the ways that race and gender intersect to produce ideas about women’s sexuality, appearance, and talent.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:40am - 10:00am
236 Zageir Hall

9:40am

The Varying Portrayal Of Sexual Fluidity In Film
This presentation will compare the portrayal of sexual fluidity among films. The focus will be on characters from the films High Art (Cholodenka 1998) and Aimée and Jaguar (Färberböck 1999). High art is about a photographer and magazine editor who fall in love while also dealing with the dangers of drug abuse. Aimée and Jaguar is about a Jewish woman and German woman who fall in love during the reign of Hitler. Both films center around a woman who is initially in a relationship with a man and then leaves him for another woman. While one character’s changing sexuality is immediately accepted without question, the other character suffers from panic and anxiety and is ultimately beaten and insulted for her sexual preferences. Additionally, the film Orlando (potter 1992) will be discussed as it features a character who displays sexual fluidity as well as a changing gender identity. This presentation will explore the reasoning behind the varying approaches to this subject. Director’s preference, historical accuracies, and stigma around the term “bisexual” will all be addressed when explaining this.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:40am - 10:00am
221 Karpen Hall

9:40am

Understanding Transgender Health Disparities In WNC
Transgender and other gender nonconforming individuals often face discrimination in healthcare due to societal stigmas, which reduces their access to medical care, and can lead to negative health outcomes. Despite the progress that has been made over the course of the last few decades, the health inequalities between cisgender and transgender people remain apparent. This project will use survey methodology to evaluate healthcare professionals’ knowledge of and attitudes towards transgender patients, then contextualize this data with several in-depth interviews of trans identifying individuals. The surveys will inform us from the standpoint of the medical field, while the interviews will add nuance to our understanding of the issue. Several different perspectives on transgender medical care will be able to be analyzed because of these procedures, resulting in a better assessment of where and how healthcare has failed in this area. This research will document and analyze factors that contribute to the health disparities that transgender individuals face in Western North Carolina, and address potential solutions while promoting health equity.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:40am - 10:00am
206 Karpen Hall

9:50am

Ride or Die
Active and semi-active suspensions offer many advantages over traditional passive systems in performance and safety, and are becoming prevalent in the mid to upper price range of consumer automobiles, particularly in more rugged, sporty, or recreational vehicles such as two-axle trucks, sports cars, and four wheel off-road vehicles. The advantages of active damping are applicable to the sport of downhill mountain biking, and such an active suspension can be made at a marketable price for enthusiast cyclists. Magneto-rheological dampers offer nearly as substantial of a performance increase over passive damping as a fully active, actuated system at considerably reduced cost and complexity. In addition to more sensitive adaptive performance, the semi-active system offers the advantage of being self-tuning, removing an unpleasant and dangerous process from the installation of a new suspension into a bicycle. The introduction of sensor feedback and electronic microcontroller actuation turns a traditional mechanical system into a modern mechatronic device.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 9:50am - 10:15am
417 Mountain View Room, Wilma Sherrill Center

10:00am

Digging Up The Dead: Death And The Afterlife In The Shinto Tradition
Shinto, the native religious tradition of Japan, includes many facets and rituals that would seem unsurprising to a practitioner of any other faith. Shinto has its creation myth, deities, shrines, prayers, and so on. One thing it is lacking, however, is a concrete notion of the afterlife. Unlike most other religious traditions, Shintoism never burdened itself with fully investigating the phenomena of death. Instead, there are traces about afterlife ideas from stories on the dark and dreary underworld of Yomi, other vaguely described lands of the dead such as the moon, to turning into a bird or even other forms of spirit reincarnation as examples of what happens at death. Some of these are discussed in a primary text of the Shinto tradition, the Kojiki, a collection detailing the history of Japan from the age of the Gods to the early emperors. However, the majority of afterlife ideas are developed through the extended exegesis of prominent Shintoist scholars from the Kokugaku School who aimed to revitalize the native faith against the corruption of foreign traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism. The scholars Hirata Atsutane (1776-1843) and his predecessor Motoori Norinaga (1730-1801) chose to build their afterlife understandings off of the fragments in the Kojiki, instead of the Nihongi, another prominent Shinto source which was written just a few years later. This paper examines the construction by Atsutane and Norinaga of a more coherent vision of the Shinto afterlife from fragments in the Kojiki and the strategies used by these Shinto philosophers to solidify their interpretations within the orthodox Shinto canon.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:00am - 10:20am
102 Carmichael

10:15am

Sentimental Objects And Their Effect On International Students’ Personal Space
The sentimental objects international students bring from home play a role in their orientation of personal space by helping to create a home away from home. Through examining relationships between international students and their objects from childhood, traveling, or gained through important life events, the author provides insight into how people claim space and how such objects alter space. The object itself has a specific meaning which is assigned by the owner and in turn projects its meaning to the space around it. When the owner leaves to go abroad, in this case to study, it seems it was crucial for the owner to bring their objects with them not only out of necessity such as clothes, toothbrush etc., but also out of personal attachment as with a teddy bear, a necklace etc. Once these objects are in their new space, the owner then appears to feel more at home within a previously unknown space. Without the objects physically being there with the international student, the meaning it holds is not transcended. In order to create a home abroad, international students use their objects as a source of personal meaning and such meaning is projected onto the space around them in order to claim the space as theirs as well as create a temporary home. Using anthropological theory to outline and explicate this process of bringing sentimental objects from home to create a temporary home while abroad, the author pieces together a story of home told through the objects international students just cannot leave behind when traveling abroad.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:15am - 10:35am
237 Zageir Hall

10:15am

Trauma, Self-Preservation and Manifestations in Art
The work of Crystal Moore is a complex combination of dark and light as well as circular and organic patterns. The after effects of sexual trauma sustained in childhood carried over into adult life overshadowing her every action. Human nature is to protect self whether automatically or purposefully, consciously or unconsciously. Moore spent a great part of her life hiding who and what she was from others and even herself. This is exhibited in the work by dark, lowly lit areas featuring crocheted items created to protect and hide. The light inside is reflective of who she is and what there is to offer others but has been carefully hidden and disguised. Circular patterns are indicative of protection and security and the organic patterns represent hope which Moore had always been able to hold on to. The body of work transitions from the dark areas into lighter, and ultimately very light areas. This is representative of her attempt through her work to tear down the emotional walls she had built around herself, not only allowing the light in her to shine on others, but allowing the light of others to shine on her as well. Through the process of making art and studying both the meaning and therapeutic nature of art, Moore is able to discover things about herself that will lead to emotional healing.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:15am - 10:35am
237 Owen Hall

10:15am

Korakrit Arunanondchai

A leading figure in the art and Internet movement, thirty-year-old Thai artist Korakrit Arunanondchai, amalgamates pop-culture, music, and his Thai origin in his pieces. He plays with the paradoxes and oxymorons of growing up in Bangkok and identifying as a Buddhist and finding his artistic career in America and adopting a more liberal western morality. He represents the dialectic between our conscious self and perception versus our unconscious sentiments in his abstract, all encompassing horror vacui installations. Arunanondchai was born in the capital city Bangkok in 1986. He grew up with four brothers in a privileged family; his grandfather was a Thai ambassador to America, France and Vietnam. He noted in an interview with VICE Magazine that his teenage years were defined by being in a semi-famous band in which he was much more handsome and talented than his band counterparts, according to famous Thai record label GMM, so, they split up. Arunanondchai is currently a superstar in the art world. 


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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:15am - 10:35am
102 Owen Hall

10:15am

The Phylogenetic Relationships Of Native And Introduced Anolis Lizards On Cay Sal Bank, The Bahamas And On Grand Cayman
Anolis lizards in the West Indies are one of the best-studied examples of an adaptive radiation, the evolution of various forms from a single ancestral lineage. Speciation and diversification in the region have led to the present recognition of hundreds of anole species. Green and brown anoles have evolved independently on many of these islands, including Cuba. The Cuban anoles have since spread to other regions, including the Bahamas and the Cayman Islands. Some of these diaspora have diversified such that they are recognized as different species. Within this group, two species occur on Cay Sal Bank Anolis sagrei and Anolis fairchildi. Cay Sal Bank encompasses a small ring of islands located between Florida, USA and Cuba. It is unknown whether these species came from Cuba or the Bahamas and for Anolis farichildi, whether or not it is a valid species. The morphological features, such as Anolis fairchildi large size, suggest that they evolved from a historical colonization from Cuba, yet this is not definitively known, and no evidence suggests when this colonization might have occurred. An alternative is that these species colonized the area from the Bahamas fairly recently. On Grand Cayman, an unknown green anole species has been introduced and using genetic analyses it will be determined where they originated. To test these hypotheses, I have generated genetic data for the mitochondrial locus ND2 from A. fairchildi, A. sagrei, three unknown samples from Grand Cayman, and the related green and brown anole species. I then aligned the resulting sequences with data from all other West Indian anoles and constructed a series of phylogenetic trees to examine relationships among these anoles. Finally, I will estimated the divergence times of these species using calibrated molecular clock analyses.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:15am - 10:35am
038 Karpen Hall

10:15am

Tin Lizzie
Everyday thousands of families experience mechanical failure of their well-loved household appliances. Distraught and worried, most cannot afford to purchase new appliances, nor hire a professional that charges hundreds of dollars. Inspired by their struggle, we designed and developed a website that helps people fix the problems themselves by chatting with a live professional. This application, created using MySQL Workbench, JavaScript and Node.js, allows privileged users—in this case, the mechanical professionals—to login and begin work, accessing the database’s contents as necessary. To ensure the success of the site, 10 volunteers beta tested for accuracy, usability, and accessibility.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:15am - 10:35am
125 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

10:15am

Cost Benefit Analysis of Waste Reduction Plans at Curtiss-Wright
This project calculates the net present value of waste reduction plans at the aerospace manufacturing company Curtiss-Wright using a capital budgeting analysis. The focus of the analysis is on the financial effect sustainable waste reduction programs have on Curtiss-Wright. This analysis estimates that the benefits of reducing waste through more sustainable programs will outweigh the costs of implementing these programs. The data was provided by Mr. Phillip Felkel, the operations manager at the Curtis-Wright, Shelby, NC site. The data involves real numbers from projects at Curtiss-Wright. Calculations include a discount rate developed explicitly for Curtiss-Wright. The analysis predicts that a waste reduction program like that at Curtiss-Wright will result in both a financial and environmental benefit for Curtiss-Wright.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:15am - 10:35am
035 Karpen Hall

10:15am

Ta-Nehisi Coates And Claudia Rankine: See Through Me The American Dream
The concept of the American Dream has been the driving force for defining what it means to be a citizen of the United States. While the American Dream can be viewed as the core of the American identity, not all can find themselves represented within the dream. Ta-Nehisi Coates (Between the World and Me) and Claudia Rankine (Citizen: An American Lyric) each address this issue in their writing, working to show white audiences that the African American experience does not reflect an identification with the American Dream. Using criticism that address the literary techniques that each author employs, I will argue that Coates and Rankine both portray how the readers view and experience African American identity and demonstrate how the prejudices each author explores become relevant to the reader. Pairing these observations of the literary techniques with support that demonstrates how the American Dream influences the identity of the US citizen will then clarify the disparities the authors are trying to stress. Understanding the disparities of African American experiences counters the common understanding of the American Dream, causing the reader to question whether or not the American Dream is truly achievable for all.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:15am - 10:35am
232 Karpen Hall

10:15am

The Geographic Origin of the Invasive Boa Constrictor Population on St. Croix
Boa constrictors (B. constrictor) are an extremely diverse species of snake with a neotropical range stretching from Mexico to Argentina. Their generalist diet, high fecundity, and live birth strategy have made them adaptable to a wide variety of environments. Due to these exceptionally adaptive traits they have great potential to become an invasive species in many environments. In the summer of 2013 sightings of B. constrictor began to occur on the U.S. Virgin Island of Saint Croix. These sightings were significant, as prior to 2013 no B. constrictor had ever been observed in the wild. As of the spring of 2016 twenty-one individuals, including three juveniles and three adults exceeding 2.25 meters in length, have been found on the west coast of the island north of the city of Frederiksted. Due to the presence of juveniles it is believed that a successful invasive population has been established on the island. Despite their growing prevalence, the origin of St. Croix’s B. constrictor population had remained a mystery. Analysis of the CYTB region of the mitochondrial DNA was utilized to determine the geographic origin as well as the subspecies of the invasive B. constrictor population. This information has important implications for management, prevention of further introductions, and further study of the invasive population. This study presents a unique opportunity to observe the onset of an invasion by a constricting snake in an island context.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:15am - 10:35am
103 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

10:15am

Early Cinema: Georges Melies' Attempt to create Cinematic Space by Lance Hickey
This research is an examination into early film director Georges Melies and his attempt to create cinematic space in the early cinema. The study seeks to identify how Melies evolved in the mise-en-scene of his films. The study will also seek to find how Melies moved beyond the cinema of attractions of the primitive film era to an expansive dimensional cinema. An examination will also be conducted into Melies’ intention for using tricks to create montage and screen dimension. This study hopes to offer new insights into early film.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:15am - 10:35am
012 Karpen Hall

10:15am

Virtues Gone Viral: Efficacy And Best Practices Of Social Media For Student Environmental Groups
This paper explores the efficacy and best practices of social media use for student groups engaged in environmental advocacy through qualitative and quantitative analysis. As a baseline for the research on social media, the author looked into and social network theory and the use of social media when applied to various activist causes. Qualitative research was compiled through interviewing leaders of three prominent student environmental groups at North Carolina public universities on their use of social media in advocacy campaigns. Quantitative research was also compiled by analyzing the social media presences of the aforementioned groups along key performance indicators and audience engagement.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:15am - 10:35am
016 Karpen Hall

10:15am

The Numerical Difference Between Right and Wrong: Ethical Implications of Human Rights Measurement
Statements of human rights are essentially statements of values. Fulfilling a commitment to human rights requires observing, measuring, and reporting on human rights abuses. The explosion in both supply of and demand for human rights measurement is, therefore, unsurprising. Quantitative data dominate this upsurge for several reasons, including their ability to measure over time and across nations and to be employed in econometric models. However, quantitive human rights measurements also present weaknesses, including diversion of attention away from the people suffering human rights abuses and toward numbers measuring those abuses. This diversion risks converting subjects into objects and obscuring the values inherent in rights. This paper will examine the need for human rights measurement, the methods used to measure, and the strengths and weaknesses of those methods for social scientists, advocates, policy-makers, and populations studied. As a recent addition to the body of data sets available for employment in human rights research and reporting, the Societal Violence Scale will be reviewed in light of this examination of benefit and detriment in measurement.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:15am - 10:35am
227 Zageir Hall

10:15am

The Realities Of Students With Disability On Campus
Since the American with Disabilities Act was passed in 1990, students with disabilities attending college in the U.S. has increased. Many new policies, services, and programs have been established to provide equity for students with disabilities. The purpose of this research is to investigate how students with disabilities navigate resources, the physical environment, and social life on the campus of University of North Carolina at Asheville. Interviews were carried out with individuals involved with services to advance support on campus included staff, professors, and students. Using a grounded theory approach, the researcher identified major themes related to resources and recognition. The results contribute to understanding how college campuses can further support students with disabilities.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:15am - 10:35am
236 Zageir Hall

10:15am

What A Drag: A Look At The Past, Present, And Potential Future Of Drag Performances
A practice that dates back to Ancient Greece, Drag performance took a new life in the 20th century within the queer community. Drag queening and kinging became a popular way of expressing one's sexuality in the 1960s and 70s. In the 1990s, Jennie Livingston capitalised on the drag movement with her film Paris Is Burning, giving the world a look into a counterculture which was not well known and popularizing drag as entertainment to the entire world. The documentary and its look into the depths of a specific drag community changed the way drag is produced, making way for TV shows like Ru Paul’s Drag Race which illustrate the adoption of drag as mainstream entertainment for individuals outside of the queer community. This change in production and audience had a profound impact in the safe spaces which drag had created and opened up channels for people who did not understand the importance of drag to profit from it. This study examines drag through historical, contemporary, and future perspectives, focusing on its positive aspects as well as the negative effects its popularization and exploitation have had on LGBTQ+ people, the feminist movement, and the perpetuation of gender roles. The research will revolve around Livingston’s film and Ru Paul’s Drag Race, as well as participant observation in various queer spaces that host drag performances to compare the current drag movement and previous drag movements. The comparison of the movements will provide a window into the evolution of drag culture and a prediction of the changes to come.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:15am - 10:35am
221 Karpen Hall

10:15am

Representation, Discrimination, And Nerd Culture: Comic Books And The LGBTQ+ Community
In academic research, comic books have the potential to tell us great deal about the social and cultural values of the United States. Comic books have historically, and continue to be, primarily published in the United States. This, paired with the fact that mass production of comic books has been occurring in the United States since the early 1990s, makes the relationship between comic books and the social culture of the United States inseparable. Therefore, representation of marginalized identities in comic books, such as those in the LGBTQ+ community, is a topic of social importance and concern. This project analyzes several comic books by independent publishers and mainstream publishers including DC Comics and Marvel to examine manifestations of homophobia, including homophobic portrayals of characters and homophobic tropes that play out in the storylines of said characters. Also to be addressed is the invisibility of different LGBTQ+ identities and the resulting consequences of lack of representation. In order to bring this scholarship into context with lived experiences, I will present on focus group research that was conducted at a regional comic book store where individuals interested in LGBTQ+ issues and comic books discussed their opinions and experiences with comic books.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:15am - 10:35am
206 Karpen Hall

10:15am

Building a Platform for Reinforcement Algorithms
Q-Learning is a machine learning algorithm which is often a starting point for understanding and developing reinforcement learning concepts. While Q-Learning, itself has significant limits in its application including long learning times and memory constraints for more complex tasks, its theory is widely used for more complex algorithms. Professors who teach reinforcement learning often start with the Q algorithm. One project based method for learning this algorithm is to build a crawler robot that can teach itself to walk. This serves as a great intersection between robotics and machine learning which both have wide interest in hobbyist and academic communities. Market research shows there is a growing number of both robotics hobbyists and people interested in machine learning, however, several barriers exist which make it difficult for hobbyists to know where to begin. Our group is developing a robot kit with fully functional mechanical and electrical systems. Additionally, software that includes example machine learning code and a visualization environment will be developed. This kit will be accessible to hobbyists and professors as a starting point for reinforcement learning. This robot will contribute to reinforcement learning research by making concepts accessible to more people.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:15am - 10:40am
417 Mountain View Room, Wilma Sherrill Center

10:30am

Computational Investigations Of 1,1 Elimination Transition State Geometries And Post-Transition State Complexes Of Hydrofluorocarbons Using Single And Multi-Reference Techniques
Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) were banned by the Montreal Protocol in 1987 due to their contribution to ozone depletion in the stratosphere through chlorine radical reactions. Their replacements, hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), are less harmful because of their more reactive H-C bonds. We present a computational investigation of the singlet potential energy surfaces of specific HCFCs which could undergo either a 1,1-HF or 1,1-HCl elimination forming a carbene and then undergoing rearrangement into an alkene. Transition state geometries are reported for 1,1 HF and HCl elimination from CH3CHFCl, CHCl2CHCl2, and similar HCFCs using various levels of theories including Density Functional Theory (DFT), Complete-Active-Space-Consistent-Field theory (CASSCF), and Møller–Plesset perturbation theory (MP). These show that there is a very loose transition state, and in many cases DFT fails to predict a viable transition state geometry because of the late transition state with highly stretched bonds. There are also clear energy differences between these theories. We show that the transition state geometry does not lead to the dissociated products, but a “post transition state complex” with a weak interaction between HF or HCl and the carbene. This new mechanism for 1,1 HF or HCl elimination may explain the differences between experimental results and previous computational studies.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:30am - 10:50am
123 Zeis Hall

10:30am

Natural Dibenz[B,F]Oxepin As A Potential Novel Antibacterial Agent: Progress Towards The Synthesis And Optimization Of Empetroxepin A And B
The increase in multi-drug resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria has made the issue of bacterial resistance a global health concern. New classes of antibacterial drug compounds, able to work outside existing mechanisms of resistance, are needed to combat these infections. Natural product-based drug discovery is an effective method in the development of new classes of antibiotics due to the chemically unique structures characteristic of naturally occurring compounds. This study aims to develop a viable antibacterial drug using Empetroxepin A and B, novel dibenz[b,f]oxepin natural products, as the lead compounds. The natural products will be synthesized in seven steps from commercially available 3,4,5-trimethoxytoluene. To date, the first five steps have been completed successfully through a Wittig olefination of trimethylsilane-protected salicyladlehyde with the phosphonium salt generated from the toluene starting material. The desired phosphonium salt was synthesized through aromatic bromination and radical benzylic bromination of the starting material. High yields (68-99%) have been achieved on large scales for each of these steps. Hydrogenation of the alkene bridge formed by the Wittig olefination has also been completed though only low yields have been obtained to date. The remaining two steps in the total synthesis include a copper oxide catalyzed etherification ring closure followed by selective deprotection to give both Empetroxepin A and B. Once synthesis of the lead compounds has been completed, the synthetic route will be used to develop analogs for structure activity relationship studies to optimize the natural product’s antibacterial activity.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:30am - 10:50am
014 Zeis Hall

10:30am

Exploring the History of Community as Created by Black Mountain College
Local lore and history often reflects the community of a place and the identity of the people who live there. A study of the past and present of Black Mountain College (1933-1957), through the lens offered by the Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center (BMCM+AC), allowed for connections to be made between the two vastly different time periods as well as between the two different settings, one being the college and the other being a museum. Based on guided conversations, observations, and interviews conducted during the Spring of 2017, this project examines the culture and community of BMCM+AC, located in Downtown Asheville at 56 and 69 Broadway, while also drawing on connections made from analyzing the community that thrived at Black Mountain College during its existence. Further research was held at the historic Lake Eden campus at which the museum holds multiple events during the year. This project includes active participation in the preparation of a series of programs and events put on by the museum for the public as well as in the daily tasks at the museum itself, including interacting with guests to keep them informed on the history of the college and the current exhibits being shown. Coursework for this project included a series of written assignments that reflect life and community at BMCM+AC, which were supported by in-depth interviews, discussions centered around community formation, and the researcher’s involvement in assisting with public programs and events.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

10:30am

Active Living Program at Asheville Middle School
UNC Asheville has created a partnership with Asheville Middle School to engage students in physical exercises to promote better physical, mental, social, and spiritual well-being.The focus of the Active Living Program was to engage students in healthy exercises that will improve their longevity, standard of living, and help reduce their risk for chronic diseases, such as diabetes mellitus Type II, coronary heart disease (CHD), and obesity, that have become more prevalent in recent years. After conducting physical exercise tutorials Monday through Friday over a 5-week period, we were able to increase physical activity levels and raise health awareness. A brief educational lesson on exercise science was included to explain how exercising is important to overall health and how particular exercises should be performed to reduce their risk for injury. By promoting physical exercise and acting as personal mentors, volunteers from UNC Asheville had the opportunity to empower students at Asheville Middle School to increase their weekly activity levels and be more conscious of how exercise affects their physiology. Research has shown that healthy lifestyle changes require encouragement, motivation, and knowledge of healthy alternative behaviors. After informing students about various exercises that improve their health and also be fun, they were excited and optimistic about continuing with the program in the future. Although we were not able to encourage every student to participate in the program, we believe that the program will gain more attention as our partnership with the school grows. Targeting physical health at a young level is essential for promoting lifelong healthy lifestyle behaviors.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

10:30am

An Examination of the Predictors of Weight Bias in College Students
Weight bias is stigmatization and prejudice based on weight and body size and thus perpetuates discrimination against individuals with overweight or obesity. This prejudice can also facilitate the development of an internal stigma within individuals with overweight or obesity creating a stressful internal environment. Specific negative outcomes of experiencing weight bias include increased risk of cardiovascular disease, depression, anxiety, disordered eating, negative body image, weight gain, and overall decreased quality of life. The prevalence of weight bias in the US remains high and presents a systematic problem within society that is causing widening health disparities, disconnection with health providers, misunderstandings of eating disorders and sociocultural discrimination. For examples, research demonstrates that individuals with overweight and obesity face unfair treatment in both healthcare and employment settings. Given the high prevalence of weight bias and the numerous consequences, understanding factors related to the development of weight bias are essential in order to create interventions to combat this trend. The purpose of this study is to examine factors associated with having high levels of weight bias. More than 200 UNC-Asheville students completed a questionnaire on explicit weight bias measured using the Anti-fat Attitudes Test. In addition, these students completed the Implicit Attitudes Test for Weight, a computer game measuring intrinsic weight bias. Data were also gathered on demographic information, health behaviors, history of depression or eating disorders, body image, and personal/family history with weight maintenance. Finally, students were asked to list their beliefs on why individuals get fat. Data coding and analysis is currently underway. Descriptive statistics will be used to determine prevalence of implicit and explicit weight bias in this sample of students. Pearson correlations and multiple linear regression analysis will be conducted to examine correlates and predictors of weight bias.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

10:30am

Body Composition, Injury Risk, Health Behaviors, and Body Perceptions in College Endurance Athletes
College sports are growing in popularity and with this, injury risk and prevalence of collegiate athletes grows. In cross country runners alone, roughly 50% of these athletes will be injured through sport with female athletes having higher risk for injury than male athletes. Further research in determining risk factors for injury in both male and female athletes is needed. In females specifically, injury risk concerns have come to be known as the “Female Athlete Triad” involving three components: low energy availability, menstrual dysfunction, and low bone mineral density. With just one or more of these factors present, injury risk grows. In addition to increasing risk of injury, presenting with the female athlete triad may also negatively affect individual wellness and performance. Therefore, it is important to recognize athletes presenting with outcomes and behaviors that increase risk of injury and to identify potential factors associated with these outcomes and behaviors. The purpose of this study is to examine associations among injury risk, body composition, bone density, health behaviors, and body perceptions in collegiate endurance athletes. Members of the UNC-Asheville Cross Country and Track Team will complete questionnaires on basic demographics, eating habits, health behaviors, injury risk factors, and body perceptions. Injury risk will be assessed using questions suggested by the NCAA’s Triad Consensus Panel. Body image will be assessed using the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire. Dietary habits will be measured using the Rapid Eating Assessment. Data on other health behaviors including sleep and stress management will also be collected. Following the questionnaires, body composition and bone mineral density will be assessed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Data collection is planned for the last week of March. Descriptive statistics and Pearson correlations will be used to examine the prevalence of injury risk among athletes as well as correlations among outcome variables.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

10:30am

Determining the Effectiveness of an Intervention Notebook for Domestic Violence Survivors
It is documented that domestic violence survivors, especially mothers, experience anxiety and fear when encountering the Child Protective Services system. With victims experiencing feelings of unease and worry within the system, it is important for any intervention to focus on empowering the survivor in oppressive environments. The purpose of this public service project (PSP) was to research the effectiveness of a new intervention - the Child Protective Services (CPS) Notebook. Part of the evaluation is being conducted, with the approval of an IRB application, through the completion of a literature review and the creation of an instrument to measure the effectiveness of the notebook. In the completion of a literature review, the author is researching evaluation methods and questions that have been used by previous studies and proven suitable for the PSP. This project creates reliable materials for initial, 1 month and 3 month follow up interviews with survivors using the notebook. To determine the notebook’s effectiveness the evaluation will include questions about survivors’ self-perceptions, self-empowerment and their understanding of the CPS system. This will assist in determining the effectiveness of the notebook as an intervention for survivors and it’s influence on their experience with the CPS system.This PSP has generated a mutually beneficial relationship between UNC Asheville and the Buncombe County Family Justice Center and has brought insight to the author about the prevalence of domestic violence in the community and the adversity survivors endure. There are many administrative and privacy challenges faced during this PSP. The author has gone through an interview process, domestic violence training and research training to ensure essential sensitivity throughout the project. The author learned that the CPS process is complex and that there is an essential need for resources to assist survivors through the system.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

10:30am

The Effect Of Soccer Related Concussions On The Emotional Health Of Student Athletes
Traumatic brain injuries, specifically concussions, frequently occur in contact sports and may result in devastating effects on the cognitive ability and mental health of the athlete. This brain damage can cause down-regulation of the brain’s metabolism (hypometabolism), resulting in reduced grey matter, which can cause symptoms such as: depression, emotional regulation difficulties and confusion. Less well-studied are the emotional deficits associated with concussions. Soccer is not usually thought of as a sport with a high risk of concussions, yet studies have shown that the risk of concussion is significant at the collegiate and professional level. The NCAA has a specific concussion protocol with guidelines for pre and post-concussion treatment and testing. When collegiate student athletes are freshman they are required to undergo baseline testing using the ImPact test, however, within concussion testing there is a lack of a thorough emotional test to determine if the athlete has any emotional deficits. This could lead to athletes being allowed to return to play with the potential health risks. Our study examines male and female college soccer players from Universities along the east coast and Tennessee to investigate emotional deficits due to their last sports related injury using a survey consisting of questions from the DERS and Beck Depression Inventory as well as compare these survey score to their baseline and post-concussion Impact test scores. Our findings will potentially identify a positive correlation between concussions and the emotional symptoms in college soccer players. The research’s aim is to help add to concussion research to help prevent the risk of future negative consequences due to concussions for this population. This study is currently ongoing, preliminary results and conclusions will be discussed as obtained.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

10:30am

Use and Impact of Portable Standing Desks in College Courses
Due to students sitting for prolonged periods of time, especially collegiate students, it is an ever-growing health concern to reduce the amount of sedentary time in the classroom. We now know extended amounts of sedentary time is a risk factor for several chronic diseases. Therefore, introduction of standing desks is a possible solution in solving this dilemma. There are no available studies examining the implementation of standing desks in college classes. To examine the use and effect of offering portable standing desks in classrooms. During the fall semester, students enrolled in HWP 178: Are you Fit for College? completed a pre-test of knowledge surrounding basic health and wellness. Students in section 2 of HWP 178 were then offered portable standing desks (StandStands) during class. These portable standing desks consist of three pieces of wood that interconnect to form a small stand that can be placed on a desk. Users are able to place a computer or notepad on this stand and thus stand while in class. Usage of StandStands was tracked throughout the semester. Midway through the semester, students in both sections of HWP 178 completed a midterm exam on similar topics addressed in the pre-test. After this mid-term, students in section 1 of HWP 178 were given the option of using the portable standing desks in class. At the end of the semester, students in both sections completed a final exam. In addition, students in both sections were asked to complete an evaluation of the class. Data entry and analysis are currently underway. Descriptive statistics will be used to analyze use of the portable standing desks. A 2-by-2 ANOVA will be conducted to examine change in test scores by group, and independent t-tests will be used to examine differences in course evaluations between the two classes.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

10:30am

Are there certain Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder symptoms that are resistant to change throughout the course of treatment?
Are there certain Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder symptoms that are resistant to change throughout the course of treatment?

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

10:30am

Dispositional Traits and Political Outcomes: Examining the Relationship Between Big 5 Factors and Facets, Right Wing Authoritarianism, and Voting Behavior
In light of recent political events in the United States, there has been renewed interest in the relationship between personality and political outcomes. This study investigates the relationship between dispositional traits (e.g., the Big Five), political psychology variables (e.g., right wing authoritarianism), and political outcomes (e.g., voting behaviors). Previous research on the relationship between dispositional traits and political outcomes consistently suggests a relationship between Openness and political liberalism (Jost 2003, Ozer and Benet Martinez 2006) as well as a somewhat weaker relationship between Conscientiousness and political conservatism (Ozer and Benet Martinez 2006, Gerber 2010). Evidence also suggests a possible relationship between facets of Agreeableness and political orientation (Carney 2008, Caprara et al 1999). We believe that by examining dispositional traits as conceived by McCrae and Costa (1985) at the facet, rather than the factor level, as measured by the NEO- PI- R we can gain an improved understanding of the relationship between dispositional traits and political outcomes. The sample (n = 148) consists of highly religious and politically active adults from the Chicago metro area. We hypothesize that: (H1) Consistent with previous findings, political liberalism and Openness will be positively correlated. (H2) Order and Self Discipline will be positively correlated with political conservatism. (H3) The factor Agreeableness may not be related to political outcomes because the individual facets that comprise the factor are split between political outcomes, i.e., Straightforwardness and Compliance will be positively correlated with political conservatism whereas Tender-Mindedness and Altruism will be positively correlated with political liberalism. (H4) The Dutifulness facet of Conscientiousness will be positively correlated with RWA scores, but not self identified party identification. Furthermore, exploratory analyses will examine the multivariate relationship between the Big 5, right wing authoritarianism and political outcomes. Statistical results will be presented and discussed in light of relevant theory.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

10:30am

10:30am

10:30am

10:35am

The Anthropology Of Hospitality: Understanding Sanctuary
Sanctuary can be understood best by examining sociocultural responses in times of administrative violence and social unrest. There is a strong historical foundation for religious sanctuary, but there is little to no legal precedent for secular sanctuary. Framing this study in terms of the current militarization of U.S. borders, the empowerment of immigration and customs enforcement officers, and the lack of legal pathway to citizenship, I examine how communities provide social safety nets for their most vulnerable members. Using an ethnographic methodology, this study draws on extensive interviews and transcripts of public forums on the UNC Asheville campus and in the wider community. I aim to show through an analysis of what people say in these settings how they define "sanctuary" by asking: What are the conditions of sanctuary and for whom? How is sanctuary spatially conceptualized? What are the challenges and disagreements surrounding the idea of sanctuary? And how might sanctuary replicate the very structures of the oppression it seeks to alleviate?

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:35am - 10:55am
237 Zageir Hall

10:35am

Daydreaming Revisited
Daydreams are moments in time when we become detached from our surroundings and escape to a visionary fantasy, typically filled with pleasurable thoughts, hopes, and desires. Research proves that daydreams encompass a similar foundation of positivity, even though they vary from person to person. While daydreaming often carries a stigma of negativity, research reveals that there are many benefits to daydreaming. The act of daydreaming can release us from current stress, give us a rest stop for our minds and provide us with an infusion of creativity. The drawings in Daydreaming Revisited shine a positive light on the subject through a better appreciation of this pastime; captured by people in moments of daydreaming and depictions of various tasks and locations that are relatable to the viewer. This body of work explores the typical expressions of people in these moments and presents images of inanimate objects or settings that may trigger daydreams. These monotonous, routine tasks, so often performed, beckon our minds to daydream. Influences for the work include personal experience and contemporary artists that reference realism, such as, Andrew Wyeth, Peggy Preheim, and Erin Wozniak. In addition to my own desire to explore this subject, the goal of this body of work is to change people's perspectives of daydreaming and to encourage them to look deeper into the positive aspects.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:35am - 10:55am
237 Owen Hall

10:35am

Thai Political Apprehension Within the Paintings of Jirapat Tatsanasomboon

Thai artist Jirapat Tatsanasomboon broke political barriers with his emergence of a specialized theme within his artwork. Although contemporary art throughout Asia still lacks scholarly research and global recognition, Tatsanasomboon became a chief leader when bringing attention to the massive influences the Western world has made on the rich culture of Thailand, as well as the pressures the people of Thailand faced by the influence of Westernized consumerism. His paintings includes the recreation of some of the world's most acclaimed artworks including creations by Michelangelo Buonarroti and Frida Kahlo. This paper will outline Tatsanasomboon’s disappointment towards the Westernized world and its negative influence on Thai culture through paintings that merge Thailand's epic characters from the Hindu story the Ramakien and the recreations of famous artworks as well as the comparison of his artwork to the originals he modernized.


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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:35am - 10:55am
102 Owen Hall

10:35am

Using Microsatellite Markers To Determine Levels Of Hybridization Between Pitcher Plants Sarracenia Purpurea Var. Montana And Sarracenia Jonesii
Pitcher plants (Sarracenia) are a genus of carnivorous plants that live in bogs and wetlands and obtain most of their nitrogen from insect digestion. Pitcher plants freely hybridize in the wild. Twenty-one natural F1 hybrids between various Sarracenia species have been documented, but little is known about later-generation hybrids. Many species of pitcher plants, including Sarracenia jonesii (mountain sweet pitcher plant), are endangered, and there is little published genetic data on pitcher plants. Qiagen kits were used to extract DNA from leaf tissues of 13 different pitcher plant individuals from western North Carolina, which appeared to be hybrids between Sarracenia purpurea var. montana (mountain purple pitcher plant) and S. jonesii. Microsatellite markers were used to determine levels of hybridization, with five microsatellite primer sets used to amplify polymorphic regions of DNA previously found to be specific to either S. purpurea var. montana or S. jonesii. PCR products were run through 2% agarose gels in order to analyze and quantify band sizes. Automated fragment analysis was also used to determine more accurate band lengths. Current results identified multiple individuals as Sarracenia purpurea var. montana and Sarracenia jonesii hybrids, and have shown possible hybridization between S. flava and S. leucophylla. Results from this project will help the United States Fish and Wildlife Service more accurately identify hybrid species and also help with the conservation and protection of pitcher plants.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:35am - 10:55am
038 Karpen Hall

10:35am

Learn Your Shapes
"Learn Your Shapes" is an interactive game that teaches young children ages 2-6 shapes. The system contains three levels of increasing difficulty and includes a child achievement system that allows parental review. Parents spend much time entertaining their children and prefer to do so with something that can be educational and good for development at the same time. In the current market, there exist very few applications similar to this cross-platform mobile app and none possesses “Learn Your Shapes” development assessment features. “Learn Your Shapes” implements techniques for teaching children through games. This is important because children require educational entertainment and parents seek to track their developmental progress. The development of “Learn Your Shapes” used the Corona SDK and the programming language Lua. Unit testing was performed throughout the development process and testing was done by peers and children within the recommended age groups. The young children and their parents. Other stakeholders include educators and other professionals in the field of child development.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:35am - 10:55am
125 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

10:35am

MLB Sluggers: How Marginal Revenue Product Relates To The Business Of Baseball
This research project examines the economic theory of Marginal Revenue Product and how it relates to the business of baseball. This theory will be tested with an econometric analysis using Ordinary Least Squares and three related regression equations. The first equation determines the relationship between runs and On Base Percentage, Slugging Percentage, and Net Stolen Bases. The next equation determines the relationship between wins and runs, and runs allowed. The third equation determines the relationship between team revenue and wins all else equal including population, stadium novelty, and the average income per capita. From these equation estimates, an individual player’s productivity statistics, and the productivity statistics of the next best available player, I can determine if the player is paid their Marginal Revenue Product. I conclude by randomly selecting 10 players, comparing their predicted Marginal Revenue Product to their actual salary, and discussing why or why not these selected players are paid above, below, or equal to their marginal revenue product.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:35am - 10:55am
035 Karpen Hall

10:35am

Bridging The Gap: Flannery O’Connor’s Exploration Of Redemption And The Grotesque In “Good Country People” And “Revelation”
My thesis examines the ways in which the moral redemption of characters can double as the political redemption of a region in Flannery O’Connor’s short stories “Good Country People” and “Revelation.” The short stories each present two characters that not only contrast with each other, but that also represent distinctive aspects of the South: the old South and the new South. Characters that represent the old South appear to be physically superior but prove to be morally grotesque, while characters representing the new South appear physically grotesque but are actually morally superior. Further I argue that, O’Connor alludes to the fact that both types of characters are in need of redemption. These stories then function not only as political allegories portraying the unpleasant but essential transformation into a new, redeemed South, but also as commentaries on the brokenness encompassing humanity at large. While many scholars have examined either the spiritual or political aspects of O’Connor’s fiction, for example scholarship by Karl Martin and Barbara Wilkie Tedford, I seek to demonstrate how O’Connor bridges the gap between the political and spiritual, allowing readers to find the grotesque and redemption as it pertains to the South and their individual lives.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:35am - 10:55am
232 Karpen Hall

10:35am

Brown-Headed Nuthatch Population In WNC: Breeding Habits And Population Dynamics
Brown-headed Nuthatches (Sitta pusilla) are small secondary cavity-nesters that inhabit open, mature pine forests of the southeastern United States. A possibly disjunct population has been reported for several decades in the region near Asheville, NC. Studies on the breeding biology of this resident songbird have been restricted to the piedmont and coastal plain. This study is intended to collect data on the local population of brown-headed nuthatches to better understand the habitat preferences, breeding phenology, and nest success of the mountain population. I will be collecting data on their nesting and breeding behaviors in both rural and urban habitats. I built and set up nest boxes specific to these birds at UNC Asheville’s campus and the Botanical Gardens, The Asheville School’s campus, and Sandy Mush Game Lands. Previous boxes set up at Beaver Lake Bird Sanctuary will also be used, for a total of 52 nest boxes at 4 locations. These locations provide a wide range of habitats for a comparison in the behavior and population dynamics of brown-headed nuthatches.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:35am - 10:55am
103 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

10:35am

Information Providers And Effects On Credibility Of Information
Today’s media outlets are often designed to cater to specific demographics. Certain outlets cater to the politically liberal, others to politically conservative, religious, non-religious, etc. In theory, this makes the source a good indication of who the information is meant to appeal to. This study is intended to find how an individual’s views of a source impacts the information it provides. The study consists of two parts. First, randomly selected participants, all likely students on campus, will be given several articles to read covering a variety of topics. The articles themselves will be formatted the same way to reduce the likelihood of bias by layout or appearance. The articles will either be attributed to their original source or attributed, unchanged sans the original source names in the article, to another source of differing credibility or (in the case of politically-focused articles) differing political viewpoint; the participants will not be told in advance about which is the original source and will only be given one version of each article. The participants will then be given a survey to complete about the credibility of the source and the varying demographics they fall into. By analyzing the credibility of the same information conveyed by two different sources, a pattern should emerge where credible information is viewed unfavorably when presented by a “bad” source and less credible information is viewed favorably when presented by a “good” source.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:35am - 10:55am
012 Karpen Hall

10:35am

The Effectiveness And Future Of Food Waste Communication
This study is an analysis of social media platforms and the ideas of communications professionals regarding food waste in Asheville, North Carolina. The study seeks to identify whether or not social media platforms have had a positive, negative, or neutral effect on the campaign to lessen food waste. Data will be collected using Facebook key words and articles, and Twitter hashtags such as #foodwaste, #composting, #uglyfoods, and others. From this regional data, a comparison will be made with available data concerning the effects of social media campaigns on food waste across the country. In addition, qualitative data will be collected from in-depth interviews with representatives from food waste conscious groups and organizations in Asheville. This study seeks to further the literature on the effectiveness of social media in increasing awareness about food waste.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:35am - 10:55am
016 Karpen Hall

10:35am

State Funding For Higher Education & College Affordability
This paper examines factors influencing tuition and fees across public four year universities in the United States. It begins with a review of the positions taken in existing literature relevant to this topic. It proceeds with a theoretical explanation of why greater state funding can be expected to lead to lower tuition and fees. It further posits that an institution’s expenses and other revenues can be expected to influence tuition and fees. It then employs several multiple regression models, incorporating different measures of tuition and fees as well as different combinations of control variables, to test for the hypothesized relationships. Ultimately, the analysis provides evidence of a strong negative relationship between state funding and tuition and fees. There is also evidence that as expenses increase, so do tuition and fees; and as other revenues increase, tuition and fees decrease. The paper concludes with the implications of these results for institutions and state policymakers seeking to bolster college affordability.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:35am - 10:55am
227 Zageir Hall

10:35am

In Their Own Words: An Exploration Of Transgender Identity
In recent decades, “transgender” has moved from being tacked on to the end of the LGBT acronym to becoming the new front of the LGBT rights movement. However, coverage of the fight for transgender rights is often sensationalized and/or focused entirely on bathroom bills (legislation regulating who can legally use each gendered bathroom), providing a singular story of what it means to be transgender. This research aims to move beyond that, through exploration of the lived experiences and identities of transgender individuals, in their own words. This study aims to explore transgender identity through a content analysis of blogs and articles written by transgender individuals, coded for themes surrounding identity and the self. The internet has become a major source of connection and acceptance for transgender individuals and those exploring their gender, who often feel isolated and alienated by family and peers. Blogs and articles published online are one way that transgender individuals tell their own stories. Through this research, their voices can take center stage and provide a multitude of stories about what it means to be transgender in today’s society.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:35am - 10:55am
236 Zageir Hall

10:35am

At Cultural Crossroads: Sexual Identity And Disability In Contemporary Media
Being caught in the intersection of queerness and disability makes finding representation excruciatingly difficult, and contemporary identity politics have been powerfully influenced by representation, or lack thereof, in popular culture, especially in film. There have certainly been efforts to aid representation of those in the intersections, such as Daniel Ribeiro’s The Way He Looks, but representation is not always enough. Sexual identities have been censored, and (dis)ability is often overlooked or misguidedly portrayed, if at all. LGBTQ+ identities and portrayals of disability on the silver screen have undoubtedly been the victims of various forms of stigma. Unfortunately, this stigma has often translated into generalization and ignorance, and queer people with disabilities have borne this burden in unique ways. While the gaps left by popularized Hollywood narratives leave disabled LGBTQ+ people craving more, the new era of technological accessibility and visibility has afforded LGBTQ+ disabled people the opportunity to create and broadcast their own experiences. Creators can now forego the able-bodied, heteronormative voices which previously allowed haphazard, second-hand interpretations of their experiences. Disabled LGBTQ+ people are not only gaining visibility, but they are creating their own films for others to experience. Narratives of internal struggle, sexual awakening, and personal experiences with various forms of oppression are being created in astounding volume, and they are creating countless opportunities for achieving understandings and appreciations. These films combat the victimizing and devaluing of disabled people and promote awareness and advocacy for disabled and LGBTQ+ communities, respectively, and the intersections of both.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:35am - 10:55am
221 Karpen Hall

10:35am

They Did Not Die Silently: A History And Memory Of The HIV/AIDS Epidemic Through The Lens Of The Healthcare Community
In 1981 the New York Times published an article titled “Rare Cancer Seen in 41 Homosexuals,” which documented the first known cases of AIDS in the United States. These would be the first cases of what we now term the AIDS Epidemic. The article explicitly reported “most cases had involved homosexual men who have had multiple and frequent sexual encounters with different partners, as many as ten sexual encounters each night up to four times a week.” Rhetoric such as this encouraged the government to blatantly dismiss the epidemic as direct result of gay anal sex, drugs, and promiscuity, which only exacerbated individual fears within an already homophobic climate in the United States. This undergraduate research project investigates the ways gay male individuals living with HIV/AIDS were treated during the onset of the AIDS Epidemic during the late 1970’s through the early 1980’s. I draw specifically on narratives from physicians, nurses, volunteers, and family members who interacted with AIDS patients and faced head on the plague that was ravaging the homosexual community. By analyzing a number of oral histories, interviews, and scholarly articles, this project locates and analyzes common threads interwoven in the stories in order to reveal the complexities faced by homosexuals living with HIV/AIDS during the initial discovery of the disease. Among other things, this project will characterize the types of interactions patients had with the medical community, their family, and friends; the discrimination patients experienced in seeking medical help; and impact on the healthcare community that interacted with the victims of HIV/AIDS. From panic and fear to a sense of purpose and passion, this silenced part of medical history can vividly be captured in these individual narratives of AIDS patients and their medical providers, humanize the lived experiences, and continually bring awareness to the ongoing crisis.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:35am - 10:55am
206 Karpen Hall

10:40am

SowBot
The focus of this project was to develop a semi-automated tray seeding system. Called the SowBot, it is intended to fill a need expressed by small scale professional operations for saving time during the seeding process. Sowing cell flats (plastic trays with many separated cells for planting) is quite time consuming by hand as 50 cells have to be seeded per flat (tray). The system utilizes what the team has learned from classes in the Mechatronics engineering program by integrating mechanical, electrical, and software systems into a cohesive machine that reduces the time required to sow seeds into the cells. The SowBot increases profitability through a significant reduction in labor and material cost. Its industrial construction allows it to keep up with the most demanding customers while surviving in harsh outdoor conditions including rain and snow. Its modular design allows for additional implements to be attached and for a variety of seeds to be planted. Though machines exist on the market that can indiscriminately add soil and seeds to a flat tray, SowBot does it with the precision required for plants that need to be


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:40am - 11:05am
417 Mountain View Room, Wilma Sherrill Center

10:50am

DFT Calculations Of Mechanisms Involving The Allyl Functional Group
Computational chemistry, in particular Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, were used to characterize the mechanism and energy profile of two chemical reactions involving the allyl functional group (-CH2CH=CH2). One reaction involves a 1,3-sulfur shift and provides information helpful to understanding the thioallylic rearrangement mechanism, while the second reaction contains an allyl ligand involved in the polymerization of norborene. In the first, the effects of different substituents on the transition state geometry and threshold energy of a thioallylic rearrangement of the allyl, RSCH2CH=CR2 are investigated. Substituents for the observed system were chosen based upon electron donating, electron withdrawing, and steric properties and were tested in a number of combinations on the available R positions. In the second, competing pathways are investigated for a proposed catalyst for the polymerization of norbornene containing a palladium atom with an allyl ligand. Competition between a β-hydride elimination and ligand insertion is addressed.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:50am - 11:10am
123 Zeis Hall

10:50am

The Stability Of Glucuronidated Phthalate Metabolites At Ph’s 4, 6, And 8
Phthalates are ubiquitous toxins found in a variety of household products. Phthalates are found in residential air, vehicle air, water, and soil. Phthalates have been shown to be endocrine active chemicals, specifically anti-androgenic. The disruption of testosterone is known to cause birth defects in male infants. Exposure to Diethyl Phthalate (dEP), Dibutyl Phthalate (dBP), Dibenzyl Phthalate (dBzP), and Diisobutyl Phthalate (diBP) was correlated with a decreased anogenital distance in male infants. This study measured the stability of Monoethyl Phthalate (mEP), Monobutyl Phthalate (mBP), and Monoisobutyl Phthalate (miBP) and their glucuronides at pH 4, 6, and 8 in urine. The urine was pooled from anonymous donors. PH 4 samples were acidified with formic acid. PH 8 samples were alkalized with Ammonium Hydroxide. Samples were purified by solid phase extraction. Samples were separated by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and detected by Electrospray Ionization tandem Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). No samples were found to be statistically different from the control.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:50am - 11:10am
014 Zeis Hall

10:55am

“You’re Born Naked And The Rest Is Drag”: An Analysis Of Performance And Gender In The Asheville Drag Community
Gender and performance have been linked in many discussions in the academic community, but the frame of this research is not to link these two areas but to illustrate how they do not exist together, and by linking the gender and performance it erases what drag really is. This research includes an exploration into the intersection of gender and performance using articles from the books Nobody Passes: Rejecting the Rules of Gender and Conformity by Mattilda, and Gender Outlaw by Kate Bornstein. This research was conducted for over a year in Asheville at a local gay bar, using participant observation and interviews to explore how gender and performance in the Drag community exist under limitations and compulsory heteronormative ideals. Applying theories of emotional labor and gender theory to my population to demonstrate the social and systematic dynamics of the drag community in Asheville. The population for this research includes five performers, one being myself, from the Asheville area. All were attendees at the main field site at one point in their drag career. By placing each performer on a spectrum to show how each of the performers existed within the institutional limitations or challenged those limitations that were placed on their performance at different venues. This ethnography’s purpose is to bring the narrative of Asheville’s Drag community into the discussion of gender and performance, showing how limitations effect performance and the ways in which heteronormative ideals portrayed in Rupaul’s Drag Race reinforce compulsory ideas of performance. This research aims to answer the following questions: What is drag? How does drag differ from everyday performance? How does drag exist within different systems or how does is not? To what extent is gender even performance? How has Rupaul’s Drag Race effected the drag community?

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:55am - 11:15am
237 Zageir Hall

10:55am

Pretty In Pink: An Exploration Of Craft As A Tactile Guide Through The Grieving Process
The purpose of this research is to help bring understanding, to the artist and the viewer, of what it might be like to experience the trauma of losing a child. While experiences vary from person to person it is not uncommon for many to feel immense and overwhelming feelings of guilt, fear, anger, and anxiety; as well as, resentment towards other family members. In this series, photorealistic prints depicting infant mortality are combined with soft fabrics and traditional quilt patterns to create works that encompass the pain of loss, as well as the love and care that remains after the child is gone. By combining symbolically loaded imagery with warm fabrics, these quilts work to represent the tension many families face to build and maintain strong relationships amongst themselves as well as with other loved ones. Artists such as Doris Salcedo use fabric and other items from the deceased to bring attention to the loss and hardships, as well as the fondness that is left behind when a family member passes. Artists Sara Lindsey and Elizabeth Mitchell, were also influential in the creation of this series in terms of how other artists have combatted similar emotions. Ultimately any experience shared with this body of work won’t compare to the reality of losing someone so close, however it may shed some light on the trauma that many families struggle with daily.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:55am - 11:15am
237 Owen Hall

10:55am

Discovering Samia Halaby
Through this paper I will be tracing the art and scholarship of Samia Halaby. A Palestinian artist based in America, much of her work revolves around activism and education of Palestinian art. A pioneer of abstraction in the Middle East, Halaby has brought much visibility to art of the region. On par with her paintings, the scholarship she independently produces is just as capturing. Halaby explores Middle Eastern art through her own visual works as well as exhibitions she curates in the United States.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:55am - 11:15am
102 Owen Hall

10:55am

Reproductive Effort And Output In Two Species Of Sarracenia (Pitcher Plant) And Their Hybrids
Sarracenia jonesii (Wherry) (mountain sweet pitcher plant) and Sarracenia purpurea var. montana (D. E. Schnell & Determann) (mountain purple pitcher plant) are two morphologically distinct species of carnivorous plant endemic to the Appalachian region of North and South Carolina. Like other Sarraceniaceae, these species are known to hybridize in sympatry, but fitness differences among the taxa remain uncharacterized. In this study, we examined reproductive effort and reproductive output of S. purpurea var. montana in sites where it is the only member of its genus, and in sites where it co-occurs and hybridizes with S. jonesii. In summer 2015, ovaries, anthers, and later seeds were collected from 8 western North Carolina sites: 7 with only S. purpurea var. montana, and 1 with both parental species and their hybrids. All ovules were enumerated with light microscopy under 10X magnification, and a subset of pollen grains were counted in a hemocytometer under 40X magnification. Seeds were tested for viability using tetrazolium, or stratified and then germinated in a controlled climate growth chamber. Data were transformed to ensure normality, then analyzed using ANOVA with Tukey’s studentized range test (ovule and pollen counts) or Kruskal-Wallis tests followed by Dunn’s tests (seed counts, seed viability, and seed germination). While seed production varied significantly among sites, viability and germination did not. Ovule counts varied significantly among parent species and hybrids, with hybrids producing more ovules than S. jonesii. Pollen counts also varied significantly, with S. purpurea var. montana producing more pollen than S. jonesii. However, seed counts, viability, and germination did not vary significantly among parental species or hybrids. Future experiments will examine the genetic composition of hybrid plants, to determine their generation. Abiotic and biotic reasons for differences in seed production among sites but not species are also being explored.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:55am - 11:15am
038 Karpen Hall

10:55am

Chess Wars
In this work we continue development of Chess Wars, a game created by Ashley Dodson, Chance Cooper, and Michael Scott. Our base idea originated from a Chess/Shogi-like turn based game with fantasy elements and we developed it in JavaFX entirely from the ground up. We developed the game as a team for a Fall 2016 Software Engineering class project. Currently the game models both a simple environment and a structure for defining pieces. Our development of Chess Wars abandoned JavaFX and now uses the Unreal Engine 4 which offers our developers a more sophisticated tool for game development. Shifting to the Unreal Engine 4 allows our developers to use the engine’s built-in functionality to handle interactions between pieces and incorporate the fantasy elements in Chess Wars that distinguish our game from other similar turn-based chess-like games. The use of Unreal Engine 4 also facilitates our focus on specific tasks within the project to promote development in an organized manner. For example, using Unreal Engine 4 creates distinct roles for developers to fill such as 3d modeler, rigger, animator, level designer, and programmer. Using Unreal Engine 4, we create a unique, turn based, board game that will capture the imaginations of gamers of all ages.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:55am - 11:15am
125 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

10:55am

To Buy Or Not To Buy: A Fundamental Analysis Of American Airlines Group
A fundamental analysis of a stock. I will use a combination of financial data, annual and quarterly reports, trade publications, and other resources to predict the net present value of the future cash flows associated with American Airlines Group (AAL). The motivation for this project is of interest to me because of my experience as a pilot and my intention to work for a major air carrier. The results will demonstrate to my audience a more advanced application of fundamental analysis.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:55am - 11:15am
035 Karpen Hall

10:55am

Pimp By Blood Or Relation?
The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao is a coming of age story and family chronicle that depicts the Dominican diaspora in the United States. The novel has been widely lauded and examined for its prominent themes of hybridity, multiculturalism, and the immigrant experience; however, my thesis offers a departure from those themes by joining the conversation regarding the less-commonly written about, but nonetheless important theme of Dominican masculinity and gender roles. I explore the ways in which masculinity is a performance and the extent to which its associated characteristics are internalized. Furthermore, my thesis calls to attention and questions the legitimacy of branding stereotypical male characteristics within the novel as quintessentially Dominican. Díaz’s narrator, Yunior, frequently and self-reflexively uses the protagonist, Oscar, as a scale from which notions of Dominican masculinity may be measured; however, his bias and insecure narration provide contextual clues about his own masculine shortcomings that suggest that as a man he needs to constantly seek external approval of his own ideas about male identity. Given that Díaz uses Yunior’s deluded narration to explore ideas of Dominican manhood, it is evident that his ideas about masculinity are externally informed: perhaps by immediate male associates within his family (unlike Oscar who lacked a father) and by the shadow of the Rafael Trujillo, the notorious Dominican dictator (who symbolizes the extremes of masculinity). Having established that the narrator’s ideas are informed externally, and given his numerous references to the subjugation of the Dominican Republic by Trujillo and the United States, I argue that the novel presents Dominican masculinity as an outgrowth of traditional cultural forms and as an inflated reclamation of authority by men who have been stripped of it historically in the Dominican Republic.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:55am - 11:15am
232 Karpen Hall

10:55am

Habitat Of Conocephalum Conicum (Snakeskin Liverwort) In Two Western North Carolina Streams
Aquatic liverworts are important primary producers in environments that do not contain many autochthonous sources of organic matter. They also retain nutrients that would otherwise be lost to the current and contribute to the structural integrity of the mats of vascular plants and bryophytes on the boulders they inhabit. Disturbance plays a crucial role in the life cycle of aquatic liverworts, with the frequency and type of disturbance critical to their survival success. Conocephalum conicum (Snakeskin liverwort) is a thallose liverwort that grows throughout North America and is most commonly found in streams and rivers in mountainous environments. There is virtually no published literature on this species, despite its widespread occurrence. My objectives were to determine the habitat attributes of Conocephalum conicum in two western North Carolina streams (Flat Creek and Corner Rock Creek). I sampled a 3/4 mile stretch of each stream by randomly selecting patches of liverwort growing on boulders. For each patch, habitat variables were collected, including height of patch above the streambed, distance of closest understory and canopy trees, and aspect and vertical slope of the boulder. The horizontal spread of each patch was traced with tracing paper, and a leaf area meter was used to quantify the area of the tracing. For each patch of liverwort, a nearby random boulder was selected, and the same habitat characteristics were measured. Data were statistically analyzed to determine the habitat requirements of Snakeskin liverwort. This study will provide a better understanding of this species and the niche it occupies in mountain streams.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:55am - 11:15am
103 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

10:55am

Greenwashing: As Environmentally Responsible Advertising
This study seeks to identify whether or not there has been an increase in greenwashing within advertising for the household cleaning product industry, particularly since environmental messages and knowledge about climate change have become more widespread in recent years. In order to measure the change in greenwashing within advertising, advertisements will be collected from a five year period. First, the difference in “green” imagery and words between the five year period will be analyzed in advertisements for these types of products. Next, the study will examine whether or not a trend of greenwashing extends to commercials. The study will examine the claims that the commercials make regarding how environmentally friendly the products are and compare these claims to the product’s actual function as it relates to the environment.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:55am - 11:15am
016 Karpen Hall

10:55am

The Effects Of Political Bias, Attribution And Delivery Medium On The Perception Of Source Credibility
Studies conducted during the preceding decades reveal important insights into what aspects of media affect the perception of credibility. Source attribution, a reporter’s political affiliation and the specific medium through which the information itself is presented all influence the public’s perception of trust. Synthesizing these studies into a single narrative seeks to further the discussion on contemporary public perspectives of media credibility. In this research I will examine the criteria through which public perception of credibility is affected. I will analyze past research studies involving public perception of trust and political bias in news media. I hypothesize that perception of source credibility will be affected by both the reputation and perceived political bias of a news source. I hope to show a relationship between these criteria and a decrease or increase in perceived credibility.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:55am - 11:15am
012 Karpen Hall

10:55am

'Fatal Consequences?' The Effects Of Judicial Selection On Procedure Based Criminal Appeals
This project builds on existing work in social science to better understand the effects of judicial selection mechanisms on the voting behavior of judges in the states’ highest courts. Specifically, this paper answers the following question: Does the judicial selection mechanism in state supreme criminal courts affect the punitiveness of the judges in criminal matters? This work posits that the variance in electoral pressure experienced by judges across selection methods result in a separate set of incentive structures for judges in elective and appointment systems. Judges in elective systems should vote more punitively than judges in appointment systems, in line with public perceptions of crime. The effect should be particularly prominent when comparing judges in nonpartisan elective systems with judges in partisan elective systems. These hypotheses were tested using two separate regression models on a selection of criminal appeals cases from the State Supreme Court Data Project, where allegations of trial error were caused by discretionary decisions by the trial judge. The results were inconclusive in both models; the findings suggest that state supreme court judges are unaffected by selection mechanism when considering criminal appeals based on trial error. This examination may have failed to account for cross-state variables that potentially biased the results. Additionally, the focus on criminal appeals based on discretionary trial judge decisions may have not been the best arena in which to explore the hypotheses.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:55am - 11:15am
227 Zageir Hall

10:55am

“Dude Looks Like A Lady:” Power And Masculinity In 1980’s Glam Metal Music Videos
The 1980’s has retroactively been labeled as a hypermasculine time, and this label is especially applicable when analyzing rock music of the decade. While rock music has always been dominated primarily by males, some of these artists used androgyny in their stage personas in ways that produced a commentary on the role of masculinity during that time. These artists belonged almost entirely to the same genre of Glam Metal rock. This project examines the content, costumes, and themes presented in popular music videos from the Glam Metal genre during the 1980’s, using Goffman’s theory of gender display to analyze seemingly opposing concepts of masculinity and androgyny. This project reveals that these artists, often viewed as a marginal part of the culture, used androgyny as a way to reinforce traditional gender stereotypes while maintaining the exclusivity of rock music as a masculine realm.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:55am - 11:15am
236 Zageir Hall

10:55am

Homosexuals As The Villain
In this analysis I will decode the stereotypes and relationships found in Johnny Guitar (1954) and other films in which the main antagonist could be perceived as homosexual, and the motivations of said antagonist stem from this single factor. I will also explore the common traits and stereotypes reinforced by these characters, and the rippling effects they have had on modern day media, including film and television. This analysis will also look at films such as Desert Hearts (1985), The Women (1939), and other films not specifically named as of yet. The effects of these films, and their presumably homosexual antagonists, will be explored and applied to modern film, as well as the present day queer community.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:55am - 11:15am
221 Karpen Hall

10:55am

Addiction: Looking Closely At The Individual
Addiction to substances currently affects about 40% of individuals in North America, according to Marc Lewis. Current scholarship focuses on the factors that lead to addiction, including the physical, mental, and emotional factors. However, current scholarships lacks attention to the environments, programs, and more importantly the individual. The individual is unique and has preferences on how to abstain from substances. A person's living environment that is not free of substances can continually be triggering or enabling even for a highly motivated individual. Thus the creation of the sober living houses programs. Sober living homes are structured to include routine with an environment completely free from any types of addictive substances. This program is not necessarily a treatment, but an opportunity to gain coping skills. Scholarship focuses on the social network formed in these homes. The importance of these social bonds should be studied, but this project will explore in depth as to how an individual abstains from substances by being a part of this program. The research will be obtained through conducting an interview of individuals suffering from a history of substance abuse who have been or are a part of the sober living house programs in Asheville. Drawing upon research data secured through in-depth interviewing and oral histories, this project will explore the role transitional housing plays in addiction rehabilitation and healthy coping strategies. While also looking closely at the bonds that are formed. The importance of humanizing individuals who are currently abstaining from addictive substances is pertinent to this project.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 10:55am - 11:15am
206 Karpen Hall

11:05am

Automatic Residential Load Offsetting Via Battery Energy Storage System
Electric power delivery is based on a real-time supply and demand process. Residential consumers using electrical grid, off-grid, and photovoltaic solar collection systems can benefit from secondary energy storage. Storing primary grid supplied electrical power or integrating a battery energy storage system (BESS) gives a homeowner the ability to manipulate household electrical load timing that best suits their daily and seasonal needs. Current trends indicate that electrical utility companies will primarily set time-of-use (TOU) billing schedules in most US markets. Under these plans electric rates shift daily and seasonally depending on the demand of the electrical utility grid. The goal of this project is to develop a convenient system that allows homeowners to optimize their electrical usage through an automated controller and BESS. Homeowners on the electrical grid can effectively reduce their monthly bill by shifting when they use electricity throughout the day. An energy controller dramatically simplifies the process by automatically making load shifts, to and from the BESS. Mechatronics engineering fundamentals will be utilized to build a successful product. Mechanical engineering components include relay switches, motors, 3D-printed parts, and automated functionality. Computer engineering and controls are also central to the design with the use of a coded Programmable Logic Controller (PLC).


Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:05am - 11:30am
417 Mountain View Room, Wilma Sherrill Center

11:10am

Characterization Of Soil And Water Chemistry In A Recently Restored Wetland. Hyder Pasture.
Hyder Pasture is a recently-restored fen near Flat Rock, North Carolina. It contains a population of the federally-endangered Bunched Arrowhead (Sagittaria fasciculate), a small herbaceous plant typically found in saturated soils near groundwater seeps. Bunched Arrowhead are found in only eleven locations in the world, all in North and South Carolina. This study represents the first chemical assessment of water and soil at the site since the restoration and adds to the growing body of work aimed at understanding the requirements of sustainable Bunched Arrowhead populations. Water samples were analyzed for major ions, pH, and temperature. Soil texture was similar throughout the study area, consisting of sandy loams and loamy sands. Cation Exchange Capacity ranged from 19.5 to 38.8 Cmolc kg-1. Areas of the restoration site that had top soil removed in order to form topological depressions were found to have lower soil organic content (>4.01% SOC) than undisturbed areas (6.02% to 12.66% SOC). Soils were acidic, with pH ranging from 4.45 to 4.93. These data from Hyder Pasture were then compared to established bunched arrowhead populations at other sites.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:10am - 11:30am
123 Zeis Hall

11:10am

Synthesis And Antibiotic Evaluation Of Simplified Pestalone Analogs
The natural product pestalone has been shown to have antibiotic activity against resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). However, pestalone is not readily isolated from its natural source, and its total synthesis has proven to be challenging due to low yielding reactions. Presented is the synthesis of 16 pestalone analogs, as well as the main carbon backbone. Attempts to synthesize the core structure of pestalone have proved difficult and are still in progress. The analogs were synthesized from either substituted benzaldehydes or phthalic anhydride using a Grignard reaction as the key step, with most yields between 65 and 85% for both reactions. The analogs were tested in bacterial assays against Gram-positive S. aureus and B. subtilis, as well as Gram-negative E. coli and P. aeruginosa, with 6 compounds showing antibiotic activity.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:10am - 11:30am
014 Zeis Hall

11:15am

An Ethnographic Look At The Social Aspect Of Gaming
This paper takes an ethnographic look at UNCA's on campus gaming club and the relationship between its members and their preferred games and gaming apparatuses as well as social circles within. Many previous studies have shown a lack of social interaction among gamers - rather that they tend to avoid in person interactions and confine themselves alone to spaces that give them comfort. This paper aims to provide evidence that that isn't always the case among gamers, that the UNCA gaming club promotes social interaction among its members while they bond over their favorite games. Through the use of ethnography, the author aims to paint a picture of the gaming club and the social culture it holds within it and seeks to compare it with the previous studies which indicate social interaction is not generally sought among gamers. It also focuses on groups and social circles within the club and the dynamics between their sub-members and other sub groups. Ethnographic accounts will provide indications that it may often be the case that individuals that do enjoy playing video games struggle with communicating with others or display anxiety with social interactions but that this is commonly dissolved when engaged in a game with others or when speaking about them, demonstrating that safe and communal places such as the UNCA Gaming Club may alleviate the pressure of social interactions. By the end of the paper, the author hopes to demonstrate that gamers, unlike previously thought, do seek out the company of others through various means, such as a gaming club, and that they form bonds and groups within safe spaces through games themselves.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:15am - 11:35am
237 Zageir Hall

11:15am

Within The Quiet: An Exploration Of The Introvert Interior
Through the progression of the extrovert ideal in the business world, as described by Susan Cain, asserting ideas and being capable of abundant involvement in large groups have become structural components for accomplishing prosperity in Western culture. The obligation to consistently exert intense energy persuades introverts that their predisposition to be quiet in contemplation is inferior. Tendencies affiliated with both introversion and extroversion are profitable traits that can be compelling when applied in the appropriate social settings. However, individual qualities vary depending on particular personalities and cannot be assessed advantageously against a standardized set of behavioral expectations. Diverse modes of thought exist between introverts and extroverts and influence the ways in which a person chooses to share and exchange information. The ability to effectively communicate thoughts and ideas directly correlates to the understanding of self-identification. The art movement of Abstract Expressionism has been pivotal in cultivating nonobjective painting methods used to capture the inherently abstract concepts of identity and communication. Through the process of expressionistic abstract painting, this research examines the relationship between introversion and extroversion while preparing a vehicle for self-discovery and exploration. The purpose of this research is to gain greater comprehension of the connection between introversion and extroversion and how the association between the two temperaments affects general communication. As a result of pairing the painting process with knowledge about the functionality of introverted identity, this project also serves to form a deeper sense of self by existing as a valuable way to decipher thoughts and emotions in an introverted manner.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:15am - 11:35am
237 Owen Hall

11:15am

Laila Shawa: The Walls Of Gaza
Laila Shawa is a Palestinian artist whose work illustrates the ongoing political turmoil and struggles of her homeland. After graduating from the Leonardo da Vinci School of Art in Cairo in 1957, and from the Academy of Fine Arts in Rome in 1964, she returned to Gaza to work with the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine. Initially, she supervised arts education in refugee camps and worked with UN war photographer Hrant Nakasian. From 1977 to 1987 Shawa oversaw the design and building of the Rashad Shawa Cultural Centre, the first center of its kind in Gaza. Shawa is credited with pioneering the method of utilizing photography to create silk screen prints. This paper will consider her 1992 Walls of Gaza II series in the context of Contemporary Global Art with the aim to contribute to the scant scholarly discourse on this artist to date. Shawa created the twelve prints in this series to draw attention to the plight of Palestinian children growing up in the violence of Gaza. Her main source materials are photographs she has taken of graffiti, which serves as a form of communication for Palestinians, due to an Israeli ban on any other type of media. The photographs of the outer walls of homes in Gaza were taken by the artist over the course of many years. The research presented in this paper focuses primarily on her use of bright and whimsical colors to chronicle the rather serious themes of injustice and persecution.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:15am - 11:35am
102 Owen Hall

11:15am

Resolving The Origin And Evolutionary Relationships Of Rosyside Dace (Clinostomus Funduloides) Newly Discovered In The Upper French Broad River Basin
A common minnow in headwaters of many eastern United States river systems, the rosyside dace (Clinostomus funduloides) is often considered an indicator species related to health of river ecosystems. While abundant in most river basins in western North Carolina, such as the Catawba and Broad basins, the rosyside dace has only recently been discovered within the Upper French Broad (UFB) basin. Though preliminary data have suggested that at least one population may be endemic, questions remain regarding the origin of this and other populations. To address these, DNA was isolated from muscle or liver tissue of specimens collected from sites in the UFB, Catawba, and Broad river basins. The cyt-b gene, a highly conserved region of mitochondrial DNA, was then PCR-amplified and sequenced. Using GenBank BLAST, these sequences were compared to identify potential relationships between populations. While data support the hypothesis that rosyside dace were recently introduced to the UFB from recorded populations in the Catawba basin, some UFB specimens share mutations suggesting introduction from other sources, or evolutionary divergence from an ancestral population predating the formation of the Eastern Continental Divide. Given the current paucity of genetic data both from recorded and newly discovered populations within the southern Appalachian region, this research provides original data suggesting likely origin of the UFB populations, and offers possible evolutionary relationships of all regional populations examined. Confirming the existence of endemic rosyside dace populations within the UFB will inform further study of their range, any necessary conservation, and policy regarding maintenance of riparian and river ecoystems within the region.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:15am - 11:35am
038 Karpen Hall

11:15am

Ballmetrics
For years, statisticians, experts, and sportsbooks have aimed to create a model that can accurately predict the outcome of a sports game. These models are kept private or sold at high cost to interested parties. In making these generalized models, outside factors are often disregarded as they may not carry a numerical value. Ignoring these non-quantitative circumstances that impact player and team performances leads to prediction errors. In this work, we create a mathematical model that uses historical statistics and a weighted value system to predict the outcome of NBA games. The value system sets a numerical value on these non-quantitative, discounted factors by testing to determine what situations consistently impact the outcome of a game and by what margin. We use the software R to scrape data directly from web pages that publish the individual player and team statistics relevant to the model. We select the significant variables by calculating the p-values using stepwise regression. We create a predictive model using this data. The model uses future games to test and evaluate its accuracy. Mathematicians test the accuracy of the mathematical model to ensure that it is sound. The results are available on a free, open source website in a sortable, table containing the currents day’s slate of games. It is open for collaboration, to create a more accurate model to any interested party.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:15am - 11:35am
125 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

11:15am

The Price Of Fruits And Vegetables: A Comparison Between The US And Italy
A case study testing the law of one price in terms of fruits and vegetables in the US and in Italy. Answers the question: Is there a difference in the prices for fruit and vegetable between the US and Italy, and if yes, what are the factors that influence such difference? In answering this question, this paper will assess the efficiency of the US and the Italian food industry in terms of delivering affordable fruits and vegetables to the consumers.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:15am - 11:35am
035 Karpen Hall

11:15am

Exploring The Gender Binary In Willa Cather’s Fiction
This thesis uses a psychological approach to explore the behavior of men and women throughout three of 20th Century American novelist, Willa Cather’s works. My research demonstrates that gender inequality within Willa Cather’s fiction directly correlates to the time period in which she was writing, but is not exclusive to the 1920s. While discussing gender dynamics within Cather’s works, many scholars focus on her apolitical approach of coping with her personal struggle with gender and sexuality. In this thesis, I examine Cather’s ability to discuss these issues throughout an art form, while she appears to remain apolitical. In order to demonstrate the negative impact of gender binaries, Cather focuses on different aspects of female oppression throughout her works. For example, Cather shows the reader the dangers of objectifying women in My Antonia, while in Coming, Aphrodite! she illuminates how men detest female agency. She combines both of these ideas in one of her later novels, Lucy Gayheart, where she reveals how difficult it is to become successful and live on one’s own free will as a woman. I conclude that the hardships women faced within Cather’s fiction were directly influenced by the oppression of women in the 1920s. Although there has been progress towards the issues in which Cather discusses, female oppression and objectification still exist in the world today.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:15am - 11:35am
232 Karpen Hall

11:15am

Communicating Climate Change On Social Media: A Survey Of Best Practices
This paper will survey best practices in climate change communication through a review of the current literature and a qualitative analysis of specific examples of discourse dynamics in social media environments. In modernity, societies must cope not only with environmental risks but also with the inherent risks and persistent challenges in communication, such as superficial public understanding of climate change and communicating in increasingly politicized and partisan environments. This paper will provide a theoretical framework for understanding effective social media communication strategies.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:15am - 11:35am
016 Karpen Hall

11:15am

Nuances On Immigration Coverage Between Spanish-Language Media And English-Language Media; Effects Of Perception And Political Participation Of The Viewers
This paper explores whether an individual's news source changes their attitudes and perceptions about authorized and unauthorized immigration in the U.S. I focused on the 2 major English language media platforms, CNN and FOX news and one Spanish language media platform, Univision. Through a two week content analysis, I compared the differences in the top story of each media outlet webpage and the importance in which they cover and frame immigration. I hypothesize that each media frames and covers immigration in different ways. Each website’s’ viewers thus observe the information and create a different perception of immigration thus influencing true nature of their political participation during elections. I expect to find a correlation between the immigration news coverage of media outlets, the perception created among viewers, and the effects on political standpoints and participation.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:15am - 11:35am
012 Karpen Hall

11:15am

The Hands That Hold You, The Hands That Mold You: An Exploration Of Sexual Assault On College Campuses
Nearly 1 in every 5 women and 1 in every 16 men will experience sexual assault by the end of their collegiate career. While many researchers have theorized that this result is due to drinking culture, athletics, and Greek life, I believe there is a deeper issue at hand. This observational study is designed to examine the relationship, if any, between higher learning institutions and the rate of sexual assaults on those campuses. This study looks at the largest state institutions in each state in the United States and compared their rate of sexual assault in the year 2014 along with three independent variables: consent, Title IX education meeting, and language used when discussing sexual assault. I anticipate that each of these variables under specified conditions will have a negative effect on the rate of sexual assault. This paper concludes with an examination of a multiple regression result and proposals for policy change to help lower rates of sexual assault on college campuses.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:15am - 11:35am
227 Zageir Hall

11:15am

Difference In Achievement: An Analysis Of North Carolina’s Educational Inequalities
The United States provides, by mandate, primary and secondary education for all citizens. The mandate does not require this education to be of equal quality everywhere however. Some locations and communities receive significantly better quality of education than others. Previous research on this disparity have largely focused on national trends. While informing the discussion on national programs is essential, states are also given considerable autonomy with their education plans and policies. The current research seeks to provide a state-specific case study of the differential outcomes in education in North Carolina. Data collected by North Carolina’s Department of Public Instruction are analyzed using descriptive statistics and bivariate correlation on the district level. Preliminary analyses suggest that North Carolina has systemic inequalities in educational achievement based on a variety of factors. This research gives special consideration to the effect of location on performance, defining districts as rural, urban or suburban. This study can be used to assist policy makers in understanding contemporary inequalities in state-wide education.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:15am - 11:35am
236 Zageir Hall

11:15am

The Very White Picket Fence: The Establishment Of Homonormativity Through Exclusionary Heteronormative Institutions In “The Kids Are Alright”
The film “The Kids Are Alright” (2010), written and directed in part by Lisa Cholodenko, portrays a married lesbian couple, Nic and Jules, and the two children they had through artificial insemination, Joni (age 18) and Laser (age 15). The family struggles with typical issues of dealing with a child’s troublesome friendship, preparing to send a child to college, and overcoming mundanity in a long term marriage. The situation grows more complicated when Joni and Laser reach out to their sperm donor and biological father, an organic gardener and laid-back restaurateur named Paul. The film makes great strides in establishing homonormativity by showing that a family with two moms is just as ‘normal’ and functional as a family with a mother and a father, and experiences the same familial issues. It demonstrates that, as the title suggests, the children raised in these families are ‘alright,’ growing into high-achieving and compassionate adults. Yet despite the good intentions of Cholodenko and other writers, this film introduces the idea of homonormativity into the mainstream only by focusing on a white upper middle-class family that reinforces a heteronormative marital structure and power dynamic. I will discuss how this and other films sacrifice intersectionality and diverse representation to make them more popular and palatable to straight white audiences, and I will weigh the benefits and detriments of taking this path into mainstream discourse.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:15am - 11:35am
221 Karpen Hall

11:15am

Something Wicked This Way Comes: Fears and Fascinations About Powerful Women
The witch archetype is one of the most important in literature and film as it fully embodies society’s perceptions of womanhood. Both genders project their fears and fascinations concerning women onto the witch, and as such witches express most prominently the duality between what people want women to be and what they fear they can become. This project aims to create an Honors course that examines how our fears and fascinations influence the portrayal of witches in film and literature. Students will discuss how these portrayals reveal the hidden biases of society towards women and how various forms of media, including novels, films, and graphic novels, determine audience perceptions. In addition, students will place representations of witches in their historical and scholarly context in order to better understand society’s changing fears and fascinations concerning powerful women. Finally, the course questions if the archetype can reinvent itself for today’s society.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:15am - 11:35am
206 Karpen Hall

11:30am

Elucidation Of Trends In Ethanol Dehydrogenation Energies Over Various Miller Indices Rhodium Surfaces
Ethanol dehydrogenation is a process that has a high potential to provide a carbon neutral source of hydrogen gas for use in fuel cells. This process involves the use of high temperatures and a catalytic metal to decompose the molecule into hydrogen gas and basic chemical precursors. However, the reactants and catalysts utilized by this process are not as cost efficient as obtaining hydrogen gas from carbon positive sources, mainly due to the high temperatures needed to carry out the catalysis and rare metals as catalysts. If the energy of reaction for creating hydrogen gas is lowered, the temperatures needed to carry out the reactions and thus the cost of production also go down. The Wasileski research group has computationally elucidated energy of reaction trends for dehydrogenation using periodic density functional theory when the reactants and catalyst makeup are altered, such as the type of primary alcohol fuel or the surface structure of the catalyst. From this data, the most favorable structure for ethanol dehydrogenation over a rhodium surface was the stepped 211 Miller index surface as compared to a planar 111 Miller index surface. In this research, a kinked 653 Miller index surface was tested and found to be in between the reaction energies for the 211 and 111 surfaces. From this finding, the current research project sets out to test additional kinked rhodium surfaces to elucidate how the overall and local surface structures affect trends in ethanol dehydrogenation catalysis.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:30am - 11:50am
123 Zeis Hall

11:30am

Photodegradation Of Trichloroethylene By Anatase And Rutile 15 Nm Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles
Trichloroethylene (TCE), a volatile industrial solvent used for degreasing metal prior to electroplating has been identified as a human carcinogen and contaminant by the US EPA. Estimated to be in 34% of the nation’s drinking supply, with a maximum contaminant level set at 5ppb. The photodegradation of TCE coupled with pure 15 nm Anatase Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) and pure 15 nm Rutile TiO2 Nanoparticles (NPs) was investigated. Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to analyze aqueous samples of known TCE concentrations and TiO2 NPs pre and post treatment with UV-light at 254 nm using Rayonet Photochemical Reactor. The results from this study agree with previous studies in the field that TCE degradation is achievable only when UV light is coupled with TiO2 NPs. Final degraded results from both, 15 nm Anatase Titanium Dioxide and 15 nm Rutile TiO2 NPs, achieved were under the US EPA limit of 5ppb.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:30am - 11:50am
014 Zeis Hall

11:35am

Ginsenoside Profiles In American Ginseng (Panax Quinquefolius L.) In Western North Carolina
American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L.) is a threatened perennial understory plant endemic to eastern deciduous forests. The plant is harvested and sold on the Asian markets for its secondary metabolites, ginsenosides, which give it its medicinal qualities. Information on phytochemical profiles of populations would give more insight on creating cultivars labeled for specific medicinal properties, ideally reducing the demand for wild harvested ginseng. Genetic diversity of ginseng is thought to be more widespread in the Appalachian region, due to the glacial refugia created during the Pleistocene epoch. Ginsenoside profile diversity may also be more widespread in the Appalachian region and may be linked to genetic diversity. We analyzed the ginsenoside profiles in 178 roots from 17 NC populations and 2 Virginia populations. Six ginsenosides (Rb1, Rb2, Rg1, Re, Rd, and Rc) were characterized and quantified using methanol-reflux extraction and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Preliminary analysis has confirmed variation in chemotypes with most plants exhibiting RG (Re/Rg1 < 1) chemotypes and only a few populations showing RE (Re/Rg1 > 2) or Intermediate (1 < Re/Eg1 < 2) chemotypes, which could be a result of outplanting commercial seeds.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:35am - 11:55am
038 Karpen Hall

11:35am

KeyRing: An Android Productivity Application
KeyRing is a mobile Android application tailored for automobile repair shops that will allow businesses to collect and store customer information, vehicle information, service information, and before and after photos on-the-go. While KeyRing can be used by any automobile repair business or extended to aid other business types, Auto Correct Paint and Body Restoration, located in Lenoir, NC, serves as the pilot organization for this application. KeyRing interfaces with an online database to store company data in a centralized location. While it is possible to collect and store this information by hand or across multiple applications, Auto Correct has expressed a need for these features in a single application. User testing at Auto Correct ensured the application is functional, useful, and user-friendly.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:35am - 11:55am
125 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

11:35am

A Test Of The Theory Of Compensating Wage Differentials In The Truck Driving Market
The theory of compensating wage differentials states that a worker will receive a wage premium for undesirable or dangerous work conditions, all else being equal. This study uses Multiple Regression Analysis based on the Hedonic Pricing Model to test this theory in a single industry. Two common problems encountered when testing for compensating wage differentials are variance in work conditions between industries and the biased reporting of those work conditions. The effect of these variables is reduced when testing the truck driving industry; many of the conditions that truck drivers face are quantifiable and collected by third parties.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:35am - 11:55am
035 Karpen Hall

11:35am

Even A Blind Man Can See
My thesis analyzes the character of Troy Maxson, the protagonist of August Wilson’s Fences. Wilson’s play presents the reader with an African American man during the 1950’s who is damaged by his past experiences and failures in his life. Fences provides readers with a valuable life lesson: even sometimes people that can see are truly blind. Troy is not able to cope with his failures and the changes in society around him, which is the same as being blind because he is living in the past and cannot envision a future. This is the reason Troy Maxson cannot approve of the other character’s choices in their lives and forces them into his philosophy. Troy’s father’s life did not come with much success and neither has Troy’s and Troy is trying to pass this down to his son, Cory. This displays the coming of age within the revolution of damaged black manhood. My thesis argues that Troy’s past experiences hinder him from accepting the reality of the other characters lives and form him into this controlling and lonely figure. Troy’s control over the characters in the play is a double-edged sword because although it might make him happy at particular moments, he has made everyone dislike him and driven them away. At the end of the play, Troy is in need of help and no one is there, leaving him no choice but to bear this burden alone. Troy’s past experiences and flawed sense of manhood make him into a self-centered and governing father, husband and friend. These traits impact the choices of the play’s other characters and eventually drive Troy into his grave.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:35am - 11:55am
232 Karpen Hall

11:35am

Album Cover Aesthetics and Gender Perspectives
The purpose of this research paper is to highlight the socialization differences between men and women responses to the visual imagery of album cover artwork. The core of the research stems from the idea that due to the patriarchal nature of our society, upon being questioned about themes represented in artwork, women and men will respond similarly when viewed collectively. However, when considered separately, women on average will acknowledge more themes in the artwork overall, as they conform to the dominant gaze as well as represent their marginalized standpoint as well. The theory is tested by showcasing 27 album artwork through an anonymous survey distributed online and analyzing the data results. The survey, however, does not test for additional values of perception such as ethnicity or socioeconomic background due to the skewed population. In addition, based on the nature of the voluntary, online survey I cannot dictate how many responses from each gender I received. Finally, a smaller sample size of 11 (two albums tying for 10th place) most effective albums at representing themes, as concluded by both men and women, were used to make the final conclusions. After analyzing the data collected, results showed that men and women responses chose the same top themes for each album of the 11 most effective albums. However, the results concluded that women averaged 3.33 themes for all 27 albums, and averaged 4.23 for the sample size, while men averaged 2.51 themes for all albums and 2.98 for the top 11. Moreover, the data supports the claim that women and men identify the same dominant perspectives themes overall, but women on average still offer more theme responses per album artwork.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:35am - 11:55am
012 Karpen Hall

11:35am

The Environmental Impact of Brewing Beer

The brewing of beer is incredibly energy intensive. Beer is one of the most consumed beverages in the world, and the larger brewing operations use massive amounts of energy and water. This study will analyze the use of energy and other resources in 3 main brewing companies central to Asheville, North Carolina, and specifically will assess how these brewing companies communicate their efforts to have a clean footprint to the community and the greater public.



Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:35am - 11:55am
016 Karpen Hall

11:35am

Pinning Motherhood: How Pinterest Users Construct Ideal Parenting
Some potential and current mothers use the social media site, Pinterest, as a resource for collecting and acquiring information and understandings related to being mothers. Through their participation, they may also develop a sense of community with other parents/soon to be parents. This recent manifestation of producing knowledge and understandings of motherhood allows for guided advice (such as those traditionally found in expert-authored childrearing manuals) to be combined with other sources of information in the broader culture. Only a handful of studies examine the uses of Pinterest, and only a few look at identity practices such as the construction of motherhood. Content analysis of Pinterest activity related to the theme of motherhood reveals patterns of activity that produce information about how to be an “ideal” mother and proposes norms about the raising of families. The study examines images, captions, and titles of the virtual boards from the Pins on Pinterest in Spring 2017. This research reveals the use of gender norms, and a new form of culture that contributes to the social construction of motherhood.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:35am - 11:55am
236 Zageir Hall

11:35am

Realistic Depiction Of LGBT+ Relationships In Film
Is the representation of LGBT+ relationships and physical intimacy in films depicted more accurately than what is seen in heterosexual films? Is the constant death of the lesbian at the end of the movie more accurate than the happily ever after of a heterosexual movie? Realistically no relationship is easy with zero fighting, a happily ever after, or fluid movie ready sex. Although most LGBT+ movies showed flawed relationships and unhappy endings which is a much more accurate representation of real life relationships, today's LGBT+ community is still angry about this. Is it better to show the public a realistic flawed relationship or a fairytale happy relationship? By depicting such flawed relationships in these films it does not mean that they are demeaning LGBT+ people put just maybe shedding a little light on the reality of life. One challenge today’s filmmakers have is how to accurately represent physical intimacy and intimate relationships. Historically, films tend to lean heavily on this happy formula when depicting heterosexual relationships, but seem to be more willing to show queer couples as fighting, or to include characters engaging in drug use or adultery.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:35am - 11:55am
221 Karpen Hall

11:50am

Antibiotic Activity Of Natural Products Produced By Bacteria Isolated In Western North Carolina
In order to treat the growing number of antibiotic resistant pathogens, the isolation and production of new antibiotics is necessary. The need to discover novel antibiotics is increased by the lack of interest of large pharmaceutical companies. The two strains being studied were isolated from the phytotelma of Serracenia pitcher plants found in Western North Carolina. Pseudomonas CM/CP G1 was grown in a 25 mMol sodium succinate minimal media, and Streptomyces SS568 was grown in both glucose and acetate minimal medias (12.5mMol). Antibiotic activity of crude extractions were tested against Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus (grown on 10% Triptic Soy Agarose plates). The presence of antibiotic compounds has been confirmed for both strains in crude extracts, and compounds isolated from SS568 are currently under test for antibiotic activity against S. aureus. Characterization of active compounds will be completed upon results of activity. Techniques of liquid-liquid extraction and column chromatography are used to purify the active metabolites, which are then characterized by 1D and 2D NMR, IR, and LC-MSMS.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:50am - 12:10pm
014 Zeis Hall

11:50am

Combretastatin A-4 Analog Bearing Indole-Chalcone Moiety
Drugs that target tubulin polymerization have largely been focused on in the field of cancer research. Combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) binds to the colchicine site of ß-tubulin, inhibiting polymerization and thus inducing the subsequent anti-cancer effects. Structural modifications of CA-4 have been made as an attempt to increase the solubility and binding affinity of the compound to the colchicine site. CA-4 analogs that possess indole and chalcone moiety have demonstrated improved anti-cancer effects when compared to the unmodified CA-4 lead compound. This research focuses on synthesizing an analog of CA-4 that incorporates indole-chalcone functional groups, and assessing the efficacy of various reactions in the target molecule synthetic scheme. One of the halogenated acetophenones, α-bromo-3,4,5-trimethoxy acetophenone, has been synthesized and purified via column chromatography. The first step of the indole synthesis was completed, in which a protecting group was added to the hydroxyl of the substituted benzaldehyde starting material. Synthesis of ethyl azidoacetate, the second step of the indole synthesis, has been attempted in two trials. The ethyl azidoacetate product needs to be purified, so that it can be reacted with the protected benzaldehyde to yield the vinyl azide product. The vinyl azide reaction has been attempted using ethyl azidoacetate synthesized by a previous research student, and the two trials were completed using different reagents. Completing the indole synthesis and reacting the substituted indole product with the brominated acetophenone will allow formation of the CA-4 chalcone target molecule through an aldol-condensation reaction.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 11:50am - 12:10pm
123 Zeis Hall

12:30pm

Analysis of testate amoeba biomass and biodiversity as indicators of ecological success in Sandy Bottom, Asheville, North Carolina
Testate amoebae are unicellular, heterotrophic protists that live in a range of wetlands and soils. Their abundance and diversity have been used to assess hydrological and soil quality measures, including pH, soil elemental C and N rations, degree of light penetrance, and level of ecological disturbance. Thus, quantifying the number of testate amoebae and tracking their diversity can elucidate relationships among different ecological parameters and degrees of variability. Samples collected from various ecological niches in Sandy Bottoms, North Carolina, during the summer of 2016, reveal differences in testate amoebae biomass and biodiversity. Quantitative lycopodium concentrations were used to establish baseline density in each sample to standardize testate amoeba counts. This method was chosen to ensure accurate sampling of testate amoebae at each site for quality control and repeatability. Sites chosen away from the trail and further from the road were hypothesized to support greater ecological success than trail. Analysis of samples consisted of pH, LOI (loss-on-ignition), CEC (cation exchange capacity) BS%, major elemental concentrations, humic matter, and water depth at sample site. CEC and major elemental concentrations were tested to calculate soil saturation and nutrient quality. Humic matter (not total organic matter) and W/V (disturbed bulk density) were also measured to determine the weight of soil in a given volume and assess porosity. Statistical analysis including Shannon’s index, multivariate ordinations, and descriptive statistics were utilized. Although we did not test for pollution biomarkers or major ion levels, it can be inferred that less availability and diversity of testate amoeba could be the result of ecological disturbance. Our study has implications for assessing habitat quality through testate amoeba analysis, but further testing is necessary to understand how certain species come to inhabit specific sites, and the physiological mechanisms that enable them to thrive.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

12:30pm

The description of a cryptic new skink species from Kachin State, Myanmar
During a herpetofaunal survey of the Indawgwi Lake Wildlife Sanctuary, in Kachin State, Myanmar, J.A. Wilkinson, J.V. Vindum, A.K. Shein and Y.M. Win collected an Asian Mockviper (Psammodynastes pulverulentus) specimen (CAS 240982) on 7 July 2008. After a radiograph and the subsequent dissection for prey items in the stomach of CAS 240982, G.R. Zug and A.H. Miller discovered a small skink species that appeared to be distinct from all described Asian Scincidae taxa. Owing to the already progressed digestive processes partaken, the head of specimen is deteriorated and absent. Herein we revisit this specimen to seek the correct identification using supportive morphological, osteological, and molecular data to describe Xxxxxx xxxxx sp. nov. from Kachin State, Myanmar.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

12:30pm

Variation in Anolis Lizard Scale Size among Habitats and Across Islands
Anolis lizards in the West Indies are one of the best-studied examples of an adaptive radiation, or the remarkable evolution of various forms from a single ancestral lineage. While most islands in the Caribbean support multiple species of endemic Anoles, the widespread Cuban Brown Anole (Anolis sagrei) is found across the northern Caribbean. Indeed, this species has the widest range of any of the 400+ Neotropical anoles- ranging from the northern Bahamas to Mesoamerica. Our advisor, Dr. Reynolds, has obtained photographic scans of this species from multiple localities across this broad geographic range. For each locality, Dr. Reynolds sampled anoles from 4 distinct habitat types: Mangrove forest, Coppice forest, Coastal Scrub forest, and Secondary Growth forest. We developed transect methods to quantify the number of lizard scales from these photographic scans on both the dorsal and ventral surfaces of each animal. We then analyzed >2000 individual lizards from 12 different localities using the program ImageJ. From these transect counts, we then estimated the relative scale size of these lizards, a meristic trait which is thought to be under strong selection in certain microhabitats based on the ambient moisture availability. We hypothesized that animals from mesic closed-canopy forests would exhibit smaller scales than those from xeric open habitats, which would be related to water loss rates. We further hypothesized that these habitat/scale size correlations would be deterministic, or repeatable, on islands across the range of Anolis sagrei.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

12:30pm

12:30pm

Biodiversity Of Testate Amoeba In Western North Carolina
Our primary objectives were to describe patterns of community composition of testate amoeba (TA) within Panthertown Valley, to develop hypotheses to explain differences within the community, and to determine if taxa occupy similar ecological niches with respect to substrate moisture, total elemental C and N, and pH. Panthertown is a high elevation Southern Appalachian fen with a unique vegetation community, including a diverse Sphagnum community. TA are a diverse polyphyletic group of shelled protozoans that dominate Sphagnum peatlands. TA have been used as proxies for water quality, environmental acidity, and land use changes globally, however little work has been done on using these microscopic organisms in the southeastern US. Sphagnum peat moss and soil were sampled from hiking trail and non-trail sites within Panthertown during the fall of 2016. Non-trail sites represent less disturbed sites with more biotic integrity and trail sites represent disturbed sites with less biotic integrity. Both sites were compared to look for correlations between anthropogenic disturbance and the residential TA population assemblages. The methods include qualitative and quantitative analysis of moisture class and water table depth. Samples were analyzed for pH, total element carbon/nitrogen content, and TA identification. TA processing followed standard wash/filtration preparation protocol. Statistical analysis included Shannon’s diversity index to determine the biodiversity of each sample, multivariate ordinations to compare species and environmental variables, and descriptive statistics of the individual samples. This research will provide valuable data to aid in the analysis of long term studies evaluating environmental and climatic changes in the fen during the Holocene.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

12:30pm

Evaluating The Time Efficiency Of Using Structure-From-Motion Methods To Generate Digital Elevation Models For Use In Strike-Slip Fault Offset Studies
Light detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is valuable for geologic studies due to its ability to detect sub-meter scale geomorphic features remotely. However, the high cost of air-based systems and the time required to operate ground-based terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) can limit efficiency when utilized for certain fault offset studies. Structure-from-Motion (SfM) can generate high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) using photographs and is becoming increasingly explored due to its cheaper cost. The time-consuming tasks with SfM primarily involve collecting aerial photographs and GPS ground control points (GCPs). To maximize time-efficiency with SfM, this study addresses the minimum quantity and quality of GPS GCPs required to achieve LiDAR accuracy. These questions were tested by comparing airborne LiDAR and SfM generated DEMs along the dextral Benton Springs fault in western NV. The SfM DEMs utilized aerial photographs obtained from a Cessna flying at ~300 meters. This methodology required minimal time and resulted in 0.2 m per pixel DEM resolution. Four DEMs of the same area were generated with SfM utilizing: (1) 10 high-accuracy GPS GCPs, (2) five high-accuracy GPS GCPs, (3) 10 handheld GPS GCPs, and (4) 5 handheld GPS GCPs. The two high-accuracy GPS GCP DEMs had minor elevation differences compared to airborne LiDAR, however, the two handheld GPS GCP DEMs had significant differences. Horizontal errors were assessed by comparing dextral fault offsets of SfM DEMs to airborne LiDAR DEMs. These ranged from ~4 to 33 m. Both 10 GCP SfM DEMs had percent errors

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

12:30pm

Identification of minerals in sulfide body within granite host at North Buncombe Quarry in Western North Carolina
The objective of this research is to identify the minerals present in samples of a sulfide body found within the host granite at the Hedrick Industries’ North Buncombe Quarry in Asheville, North Carolina. The geologic setting of the research area is the late Proterozoic aged Ashe Metamorphic Suite (AMS), which is underlain by the Mesoproterozoic aged Grenville basement. The quarry is mining out of a granitic intrusion within the AMS. Quarry operations have met the contact zone between the AMS and the Grenville basement, where they have encountered the sulfide body within the granite intrusion. The AMS, which makes up a majority of surface rocks in western North Carolina, is composed of highly metamorphosed schists and gneisses and some intrusions of ultramafic and granitic rocks. The much older Grenville basement is composed of metamorphic rocks. In August 2016, the quarry began excavating the granite intrusion containing said sulfide deposit, and the conveyor belt leaving the jaw crusher repeatedly shut down as the metallic ore was picked up by metal detectors, to prevent metallic minerals from advancing farther through the crushing process. Samples of the deposit exhibit mild magnetism and metallic luster and were found in both concentrated amounts and distributed throughout the granite samples. Preliminary analyses have identified the majority of the body to be pyrrhotite with the presence of other sulfide minerals. This study identifies the minerals present and their approximate amounts by use of reflective light microscopy, x-ray fluorescence (XRF), backscattered electron (BSE) imaging and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) using a scanning electron microscope (SEM).


Wednesday April 26, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

12:30pm

Identification of minerals in sulfide body within granite host at North Buncombe Quarry in Western North Carolina
The objective of this research is to identify the minerals present in samples of a sulfide body found within the host granite at the Hedrick Industries’ North Buncombe Quarry in Asheville, North Carolina. The geologic setting of the research area is the late Proterozoic aged Ashe Metamorphic Suite (AMS), which is underlain by the Mesoproterozoic aged Grenville basement. The quarry is mining out of a granitic intrusion within the AMS. Quarry operations have met the contact zone between the AMS and the Grenville basement, where they have encountered the sulfide body within the granite intrusion. The AMS, which makes up a majority of surface rocks in western North Carolina, is composed of highly metamorphosed schists and gneisses and some intrusions of ultramafic and granitic rocks. The much older Grenville basement is composed of metamorphic rocks. In August 2016, the quarry began excavating the granite intrusion containing said sulfide deposit, and the conveyor belt leaving the jaw crusher repeatedly shut down as the metallic ore was picked up by metal detectors, to prevent metallic minerals from advancing farther through the crushing process. Samples of the deposit exhibit mild magnetism and metallic luster and were found in both concentrated amounts and distributed throughout the granite samples. Preliminary analyses have identified the majority of the body to be pyrrhotite with the presence of other sulfide minerals. This study identifies the minerals present and their approximate amounts by use of reflective light microscopy, x-ray fluorescence (XRF), backscattered electron (BSE) imaging and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) using a scanning electron microscope (SEM).


Wednesday April 26, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

12:30pm

Kinematic And Deformation Temperature Constraints During Acadian Dextral Strike-Slip Faulting On The Burnsville Fault In Asheville, NC
The Appalachian Orogen records three mountain building events attributed to the creation of Pangaea; the Ordovician Taconic, Silurian-Devonian Acadian, and the late Paleozoic Alleghanian orogenies. In North Carolina, the rocks of the Ashe Metamorphic Suite were juxtaposed onto ~1 billion year old basement rocks during the Taconic. This contact was reactivated during the Acadian by the dextral strike-slip Burnsville shear zone, recognized by previous studies from Asheville north to Carvers Gap, NC. This study presents detailed field mapping and kinematic analysis of rocks collected along a transect through the Burnsville shear zone in Asheville, NC. Field observations and microstructural analysis of the rocks were combined with electron-backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis to quantify the amount and the depth of dextral shearing that occurred during the Acadian orogeny. Shear sense indicators seen in the field and microscopically supports dextral strike-slip shearing. EBSD and microstructural measurements were combined to calculate the vorticity (Wm; the ratio of flattening to shearing where 1 suggests shearing and 0 suggests flattening) and the strain ratio (Rxz; the ratio of the axes of flattening and shearing). Results indicate a Wm of 0.99 (minor flattening) and Rxz of 5.4, suggesting the rocks in one portion of the shear zone were shortened by 12.5% perpendicular to foliation and extended by 14.3% parallel to shear zone foliation. These data were collected from a sample with a lower strain, suggesting that the bulk extension and shearing across the shear zone is higher. Estimates of deformation temperatures from quartz lattice preferred orientations (LPO) collected from EBSD analysis as well as evaluation of quartz recrystallization suggest a temperature of ~600° C during Acadian dextral shearing, a depth of ~20 km. U-Pb ages from zircon in an undeformed granite dike that crosscuts the shear zone indicates that dextral shearing ended by ~330 Ma.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

12:30pm

The Urban Heat Island in Asheville, NC
The purpose of this experiment is to determine if an Urban Heat Island is present in Asheville, NC. With the onset of low albedo, the urban canyon, the urban dust dome, and decreased levels of vegetation affecting biological communities in city centers, it’s becoming increasingly relevant to measure the temperature differences that arise in these areas. By conducting this experiment we will obtain a better understanding of the Urban Heat Island and its effects, where particular temperature hotspots are likely, and how commercial, residential, and wilderness areas are impacted relative to urban centers.The research questions that this experiment intends to answer are: Is there an Urban Heat Island effect within the city of Asheville? If so, how strong is the effect, and in what areas is it the strongest? This is being determined by DS1921 Thermochron ibuttons throughout various locations in downtown, east, west, north, and south Asheville. The locations include completely paved, residential, greenspace, and wilderness areas.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

12:30pm

Urban Bird Song
Birds are a critical part of the urban ecosystem, and we intend to study the effects urban living has on them, particularly regarding urban noise. It has been theorized that urban noise may sabotage the normal living of birds by muffling their songs, making it more difficult to find a mate, as well as muting the sounds of both predators and prey, hampering birds’ abilities to survive attack and feed themselves. Our experiment will focus on the former and whether or not birds account for and adapt to urban noise in order to communicate with each other. If they do, this demonstrates urban adaptation and the potential for the bird in question to survive continuously in an urban environment. If they do not, this demonstrates anthropogenic effects on the birds that have the potential to threaten their existence in an urban setting. We intend to observe the song of a chosen bird, likely either the song sparrow or the cardinal, in both an urban and a rural setting, to discover whether or not these birds compensate for urban noise. These two species are present in Asheville, have distinguishable songs, and have been used in similar studies regarding urban ecology.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

12:30pm

Urban Forest Benefits
Urban forests provide a myriad of different ecosystem services for urban settings that are frequently overlooked and taken for granted. The purpose of our group’s project will be to establish and quantify a range of different services that urban forest systems on the UNCA campus provide. Our research is motivated by the fact that urban systems are growing and show no sign of diminishing for the remainder of our species time on earth. While population growth is projected to increase in the coming years it is of the utmost importance that research be carried out and data compiled on the benefits of urban forests for urban communities. In general, there seems to be a trend in which humans are less and less aware of the necessity of sustaining the natural world if our species is to persist. The proliferation of urban centers coincides, almost inherently, with loss of biodiversity and deforestation. As such, it is imperative that the services these natural systems provide is quantified and communicated to the general public. Specifically, the research question our group will be attempting to answer is how do the urban forests of UNCA contribute to carbon storage, water retention, and uptake of particulate matter? Also, we will establish the monetary value that these systems provide through these services. We hypothesize that the urban forest systems of UNCA will carry out the aforementioned ecosystem services at a higher/faster rate than other systems containing a diminished forested component. In order to determine the rate at which these systems perform these services and what they are worth in monetary terms the following methods will be utilized. Components of the urban forest system on the UNCA campus will be evaluated using the i-Tree eco program which includes systems for quantifying amounts of carbon sequestered, water retained, and particulate matter processed based on sample plots used to extrapolate data for the overall site. Before this can be accomplished a pre-existing database of diameter at breast height (DBH) for trees contained on the UNCA campus will be referenced and added to thorough field collection of DBH on more trees in order to obtain the base amount of data required to employ the use of i-Tree eco. During this process the scientific literature will be referenced in order to gain a more complete understanding of pre-existing research in similar fields and some of the methods they utilize


Wednesday April 26, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

12:30pm

Urban Wildlife Camera Traps: Study Of Species Richness On UNCA’s Campus
We will place wildlife cameras, to sample the local animal species located on and near University of North Carolina Asheville’s campus. Three wildlife cameras will be placed around the urban forests in the area. The species in the photos will be identified and the time of capture will be noted. We will attempt to estimate population size of the species captured. We will analyze the data to determine when certain species are most active and if any environmental conditions such as weather or moon phases play a statistically significant role. The goal of the study is to identify the species that inhabit the urban forests and the times they are most active, in order to allow for sustainable urban planning in the area. The local species play a vital role in natural ecosystem processes that are fundamental to the health of the urban forest around UNCA. A greater understanding of the local urban forest animal species will allow for more informed planning when UNCA wants to expand its campus, without diminishing the natural ecosystem services provided by the fauna


Wednesday April 26, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

12:30pm

Modeling Glucose Dynamics Following Consumption of Consumer Health Drinks
Diet conscious consumers today are often faced with a wide variety of claims from products which use sometimes dubious science to back themselves up. One goal for some consumers is to maintain stable long term blood sugar (glucose) levels to control hunger, increase overall energy and feelings of well-being, and reduce risk factors for type II Diabetes. In answer to this consumer demand, there has emerged a new marketplace of meal replacement drinks, pre/post workout shakes, and other health related dietary products. In our study, we analyze the effects of several of these products on blood sugar, with and without exercise, as compared to normal diet using student data collected via glucometer. For the purposes of our analysis, we utilize a differential equation model which has been previously shown to be effective at modeling blood glucose and its dynamics with insulin and glucagon. Data analysis and numerical model simulation is performed using R and Python. Sensitivity analysis is performed on the system to determine best strategies for controlling spikes in blood glucose, as well as the overall degree of success which may be expected in an ideal dietary scenario. We compare and reflect upon the qualitative and quantitative differences in the blood glucose response dynamics for each of the studied products.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

12:30pm

Deorphanization of Vomeronasal Type-2 Receptors
The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is an olfactory sense organ located in the nose of mice that detects pheromone signals through ligand binding to G-protein coupled receptors. There are three families of VNO receptors, V1R, V2R, and FPR. V2Rs in mice primarily serve to bind large molecules like the major urinary proteins (MUPs), proteins secreted in urine that trigger contextual behaviors in the recipient. Through combinatorial coding, multiple combinations of MUPs can activate multiple V2Rs in different ways, leading to complex signals based on a small library of ligands. This research sets out to deorphanize V2Rs and pair them with their cognate ligands to create a library of receptor-ligand pairings. Receptor primers are amplified through PCR, then cloned into E. coli expression vectors. Expression vectors are then placed into cell lines, and GPCR activity is analyzed using patch clamp. Ligands are introduced to patched cells, and membrane depolarization indicates a successful match of receptor and ligand. These experiments are an important first step to being able to better understand and map the exact neural pathways activated by an environmental chemical stimulus, and how it produces a response in the host.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

12:30pm

Developing Patch Clamp Analysis Techniques to Deorphanize VSNRs
Major urinary proteins (MUPs) are a class of species-specific pheromones that have been found to produce consistent and specific behavioral responses in mice independent of prior conditioning. MUPs are detected through an accessory olfactory system known as the vomeronasal organ, which expresses sensory receptors (VSNRs) designed for MUP binding. Here the activity of VNSRs is intended to be studied using patch clamp analysis by recording VNSR activation upon exposure to specific MUPs as evidenced by voltage change. CHO cells will be transfected to express VNSRs for analysis. The current primary goal includes developing an effective patch clamp protocol allowing for whole cell electrophysiological recording. This research is proposed to allow for the future tracing of synaptic projections throughout the brain beginning with VSNR activation, providing insight into the neurological basis of behavioral reactions.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

12:30pm

Using hormone treatments to regulate gene expression of MUPs in HEPA1-6 cells
The genome of the house mouse, Mus musculus, contains 21 major urinary proteins (MUPs). A given mouse will express and emit a certain subset of MUPs, which can then be used to identify individual mice. The mechanism by which particular MUPs are chosen for expression is not clearly understood. This study looks at the regulation in gene expression of the MUPs. Hormone treatments on a cultured mouse liver cell line were used to induce gene expression. HEPA1-6 cells were treated with testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, growth hormone and thyroxine individually or in combination. Alternatively, inhibition of methylation enzymes was used as a mechanism to “turn on” gene expression of the MUPs. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gel electrophoresis were used to study MUP expression at the RNA level. The MUPs present a model system for studying gene regulation, and contributes to the greater understanding of one of molecular biology’s long standing questions.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

12:30pm

Acoustic Frequency Response of Open Tubes
A lock-in amplifier is used to determine the acoustic response a system over a range of stimulus frequencies. The lock-in amplifier implements this by simultaneously creating a stimulus at a selected frequency, recording the resulting response, and isolating the part of the signal that is produced at the incident frequency. This gives information about the resonant frequencies of the analyzed system, which is useful for determining the system’s acoustic properties. For this particular project, we will be using the lock-in amplifier to measure the resonance frequencies of open tubes of various lengths. Additionally, tube-like systems such as corrugated tubes, tubes connected in T-joints, and tubes partially submerged in water can be analyzed using this technique. A better understanding of the acoustic properties of these systems is useful because they are similar to several real world systems such as heart stents and oil pipelines.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

12:30pm

Measuring Variations of the Speed of Sound in a Corrugated Tube
This work studies how the speed of sound in a corrugated tube decreases relative to the speed in free space. Previous students at the University of North Carolina Asheville have engaged in research to determine this speed. The results from these studies were obtained with an uncertainty that rendered the changes of speed within the tube indeterminable due to low sampling rate. Other experimenters have published similar experiments under the assumption that the change in the speed of sound remains constant throughout the tube. This study seeks to refine previous research by measuring possible variations in the speed along the tube’s length. To accomplish this, a higher sampling rate and noise reduction procedures will be used to lower uncertainty, thereby allowing the accuracy necessary to map the change of the speed of sound as it travels through the tube. This will be done by using a ‘one-shot’ method in which frequency controlled bursts of sound are received by a decreasingly distant sound sensor.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

12:30pm

The Effects of Dispersion on the Speed of Sound within a Corrugated Tube
This work studies how the speed of sound in a corrugated tube decreases relative to the speed in free space. Previous students at the University of North Carolina Asheville have engaged in research to determine this speed. The results from these studies were obtained with an uncertainty that rendered the changes of speed within the tube undeterminable due to low sampling rate. This study seeks to refine previous research by measuring possible variations in the speed along the tube’s length.  To accomplish this, a higher sampling rate and noise reduction procedures will be used to lower uncertainty, thereby allowing the accuracy necessary to map the change of the speed of sound as it travels through the tube. This will be done by using a ‘one-shot’ method in which frequency controlled bursts of sound are received by a decreasingly distant sound sensor. Additional analysis will be done to investigate the effects of dispersion. This will be done by analyzing pulses of different frequencies as well as doing some frequency spectrum analysis.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Concourse - Wilma Sherrill Center

1:00pm

The Racial Disparities Within The Art And Life Of Jean-Michel Basquiat
Jean-Michel Basquiat was a prominent neo-expressionist artist within the 1970s until his early death in 1988. His work brought the culture of graffiti and street art into fine art galleries and elite museums around the world building opportunities for black and other minority artists that would follow him in years to come. Although Basquiat did not see himself as an activist, this paper argues that messages in his art attacked cultural appropriations by mainstream society as well as the struggles of black and Latino communities. Specifically, works entitled, “Irony of a Negro Policeman” (1981) and “Defacement (Death of Michael Stewart)” (1983) addressed the issues of racial and social inequality for these same groups. Looking at Basquiat’s work against laws and police practices of the 1980s, such as racial profiling and “stop and frisk,” one finds that his art has become even more relevant today.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:00pm - 1:20pm
237 Owen Hall

1:00pm

Consequences Of Hybridization Between Sarracenia Purpurea Var. Montana And Sarracenia Jonesii
Sarracenia purpurea var. montana, the mountain variety purple pitcher plant, inhabits mountain bogs and hybridizes with the endangered mountain sweet pitcher plant, S. jonesii. As carnivorous plants, these species rely on trapped prey for nutrients, but do so in different ways, and hybrids are assumed to be less effective at capturing prey. As a result, hybridization between these species may be detrimental to offspring. We examined the effects of hybridization of microorganisms living in pitcher fluid. Communities included but were not limited to rotifers, paramecia and copepods. In addition, we compared patterns in micro and macro communities. Fluid samples containing communities were collected from hybrids and S. purpurea in western NC. Communities were quantified from samples taken from the pitcher plants through physical counting of the samples. It is expected that there will be a larger and more diverse micro-community in S. purpurea than the hybrids due to the differences in morphology. Ongoing work includes the mechanisms by which organisms are more likely to colonize S. purpurea than hybrids, and the behavior of pollinators that leads to cross-pollination.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:00pm - 1:20pm
038 Karpen Hall

1:00pm

A Comparison Of Southern Appalachian Wetland Soils
A previous study characterized the soil of four Southern Appalachian wetland sites where endangered pitcher plants of the Sarracenia genus are currently growing. Pitcher plants are known to thrive in weakly acidic, nutrient-poor environments and are susceptible to competition from woody species when soils undergo nutrient shifts. The pitcher plant soils were found to have a pH range of 3.52 - 5.08 and cation exchange capacity (CEC) of between 7.3 - 99.8 cmol/kg. Base cation saturation ranged from 0.4 - 20.1 % and organic carbon from 4.9 - 32.9 % across the four sites. The project was then expanded to include soils collected from four sites where pitcher plants are not growing. Soil pH, CEC, exchangeable cations, and organic carbon were again used as methods to characterize non-pitcher plants soils so that direct comparisons could be made to pitcher plant soils. The non-pitcher plant soils will be evaluated as to whether they have higher concentrations of base cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+ and Na+) and/or higher pH than do the soils of pitcher plant sites. This presentation will focus on determining if the soil of Southern Appalachian wetlands is consistent across sites or if pitcher plant sites have a unique chemical signature.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:00pm - 1:20pm
014 Zeis Hall

1:00pm

Synthesis And Analysis Of Octahedral Co(III) Mixed Bidentate Ligand Complexes
Octahedral mixed ligand cobalt(III) complexes derived from bidentate nitrogenous ligands such as ethylenediamine (en), 2,2’-bipyridine (bpy), and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) have garnered interest for their usage in diverse applications such as bacterial inhibition (biochemistry) and increased photocathode efficiency in dye-sensitized solar cells (materials science). While much research has been undertaken on unmixed ligand complexes of Co(III), relatively little has been reported on the mixed complexes. The goal of this project is to investigate more efficient synthesis schemes for higher yields of these complexes, and to also record information via ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy for determining and comparing the complexes’ structural properties. Two experiments are presented from this project. In the first experiment, the synthesis of [Co(bpy)2(phen)]Cl3 is discussed. This complex was obtained in very low yield, calling into question the quality of the synthesis and demanding a revised reaction scheme. In the second experiment, the synthesis of trans-[Co(en)2Cl2]Cl is presented. Comparisons of the UV-vis spectra of the synthesized complex, its CoCl2·6H2O starting material, and a commercially purchased sample of complex are presented. The findings from these experiments will be used for further developments and characterization of these cobalt complexes and their utilities in other fields of science.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:00pm - 1:20pm
123 Zeis Hall

1:00pm

Androids Dream Of Electric Mice: Navigating Mazes With Anki’s Cozmo
Understanding and optimizing algorithms are cornerstones of computer science. Teaching these concepts can be a challenge for educators, due to the difficulty of creating effective visualizations. For example, educators often demonstrate maze-solving algorithms via two-dimensional computer simulations, in which a disc navigates a maze. Using Anki’s Cozmo robot, we have developed software that navigates through a maze using pledge, coin-flip, wall-follower, and Trémaux’s algorithm. Using this software, we are able to visually complete a maze and compare the runtimes of each algorithm. In order to properly test the software, we had external testers create their own mazes, and run each algorithm on the resulting maze.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:00pm - 1:20pm
125 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

1:00pm

The Modern American Dream: Reevaluating The Current State Of Intergenerational Mobility In The U.S.A
A reexamination of the study “Influences of Socioeconomic Backgrounds on the Earnings of Young Men” by BF. Kikier through econometric analysis exploring the question what is the impact of parental income on one’s future earning taking into account one’s education, intelligence, and motivation? This question is based on theories from Gary Becker’s early work being that parents devote time and money into their children and these inputs are passed on to the child in terms of future success. Exploring this topic, using modern data, will allow a greater understanding of mobility from generation to generation to understand if have we lost sight of the passion that drives Americans every day.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:00pm - 1:20pm
035 Karpen Hall

1:00pm

Reason Through Religion: The Semiotics Of Fahrenheit 451
This thesis examines Ray Bradbury’s novel Fahrenheit 451 semiotically to determine the role of signs in science and religion. Bradbury aligns Biblical allusions with reading banned literature in his novel to show that religion and intellectual enlightenment are dependent on individual perception. I engage with Marc Angenot, a social theorist and literary critic, and Carl Raschke, a theologian, on the semantics of Science Fiction and Christian rhetoric, in order to demonstrate how both have indistinct signifiers. In doing so my thesis will show how the totalitarian society in Fahrenheit 451 manipulates the imprecision of the scientific and religious language through censorship and distraction, keeping everyone in the novel from the becoming individuals. Further my thesis reveals the signifiers of the physical body that point toward the signified soul through the characters physical and mental conditions in the novel. This physical representation extends itself to the text of the novel, becoming a signifier of the signified metanarrative in Fahrenheit 451. This thesis illuminates the complex intertextuality of the signifier and the signified in Christian rhetoric and Science Fiction, proving that they are both codependent and strictly reliant on individual perception.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:00pm - 1:20pm
232 Karpen Hall

1:00pm

A Computerized Text Analysis Of Optimism Expressed By Candidates During The 2016 General Election Cycle
In this study, instances and frequency of optimism expressed by candidates in the 2016 general election cycle are determined through employing the computerized text analysis software, DICTION 7.0. The presence of optimistic lexical units and broader implications made by candidates, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump in major speeches are analyzed and compared. The technical and creative capabilities, and methods of Diction 7.0 are discussed in detail. In addition, research regarding the influence of optimism in politics on consumer perception are discussed as implications of this study. The analysis of conveyed optimism by the two candidates reveals insight into the use and effects of rhetoric in the 2016 general election.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:00pm - 1:20pm
012 Karpen Hall

1:00pm

Environmental Impact During War: Media Coverage
This study is an analysis of environmental harm caused during war and how that harm is covered, if at all, in the media. The purpose is to discover the amount of coverage reported on during and after war time, while looking to answer why there would be a lack of coverage and what type of coverage, if any, there is. This paper is based on qualitative research retrieved from several online search engines that range from mainstream media organizations to blog and local media outlets. These articles are going to examine how much this topic is covered in the media focusing on whether it is from a major outlet or a small one. By examining this data, it will be determined if there is a lack of reporting on environmental harm caused by war. This study broadens a topic that is often unreported with the hope to educate further on environmental implications.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:00pm - 1:20pm
016 Karpen Hall

1:00pm

Service Or Selfies: Impact And Motivation Of Youth Group Missions Trips
Citizens of the United States have a long history of leaving the country in an effort to help those they deem less fortunate than ourselves. While well intentioned youth spend large sums of money to travel to foreign countries, the communities they seek to improve, are at times abandoned completely when students are busy with school, returning these groups to their isolated struggles. Research shows the positive and negative outcomes of this short term work on the participating youth and the visited communities, however there is little focus upon the perspectives of the continuously returning leaders of these trips. This research analyses the observed impact of short term, international service work, completed by young participants. Through interviews with several youth directors who have spent many years of their careers leading service trips, this research examines the observed impact and motivations of the participating youth on short term international service trips. This research lead to a better understanding of what youth leaders value about these trips, and what they see as being either beneficial or harmful to the overall experience of short term missions.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:00pm - 1:20pm
236 Zageir Hall

1:00pm

Southern Queer Erasure In Film: Fried Green Tomatoes & The Color Purple
History has often forgotten or refused to acknowledge the presence Southern Queer culture, instead choosing to focus on queer communities and actions in Northern metropolitan areas. This presentation will analyze the impact of queer erasure and it’s presence in the film adaptations of The Color Purple and Fried Green Tomatoes. Furthering the discussion of the oft dueling identities of queer and southern, as well as demonstrating the space that both of these identities occupy in each film.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:00pm - 1:20pm
221 Karpen Hall

1:00pm

1:20pm

Walton Ford’s Humanity Of Animals
In his artistic practice, Walton Ford (b. 1960) engages the visual culture of natural history illustration as well as narratives pertaining to animal behavior and evolutionary science by George Orwell and Charles Darwin, respectively. Ford uses animals as surrogates to examine and exemplify human nature and man’s folly. As such, his imagery comments on our relationship with animals. His work references the limitations and ironies of mankind’s attempts to understand animals in regards to such practices as taxidermy, field research, and co-habitation. Ford’s watercolors evoke the scale and format of the well-known natural history illustrations of John James Audubon (1785-1851), but take a more humorous tone. While a small amount of scholarly research on the art of Walton Ford has focused on generalizations of the playfulness in his works, this paper will more specifically analyze the human/animal dynamic in works featuring primates, such as “Sanctuary” (1998), “Fallen Mias” (2000) and the companion pieces, “The Orientalist” and “The Forsaken” (1999).


Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:20pm - 1:40pm
237 Owen Hall

1:20pm

Identifying Regions Of Gα12 Critical In ARAF Interaction
The G12/13 subfamily of G protein α subunits provide conduits between cell-surface receptors and an expansive array of target proteins that are important in a wide range of biological events. My research project specifically focused on studying the interaction between Gα12 and its target protein ARAF. Activation of the protein ARAF by Gα12 upregulates RFFL E3 ubiquitin ligase, which leads to destabilization of PRR5L, a subunit of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2). This signaling pathway is crucial for fibroblast migration and pulmonary fibrosis development. My research project was to identify structural features that are critical in the interaction between Gα12 and ARAF. I conducted pulldown experiments with various Gα12 cassette substitution mutants, in which regions of six amino acids in Gα12 were replaced by the filler sequence Asn-Ala-Ala-Ile-Arg-Ser (NAAIRS). Preliminary results indicate a significant disruption in Gα12 ability to interact with ARAF with NAAIRS substitution near the N-terminus region.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:20pm - 1:40pm
038 Karpen Hall

1:20pm

Optimization Of Synthesis And Antibiotic Evaluation Of Heterocyclic Depsidone Analogs
Depsidone natural products are potent inhibitors of Gram-positive bacteria, with MIC values ranging from 0.1–8.0 μg/mL. By synthesising various heterocyclic depsidone analogs and testing them on antibacterial assays, the antibiotic activity against Staphylococcus aureus will be observed as well as its correlation with the electronic profile of the analog. Synthesis and optimization of pyridine, furan, and thiophene depsidone analogs has been accomplished through an optimized 4-step synthetic sequence beginning from the corresponding 2-carboxyphenylboronic acid heterocycles. After the methyl protection of the heterocycle is achieved, the central 7 membered ring of each depsidone analog is produced by first coupling to catechol through a Cu(OAc)2 catalyzed reaction (12-25% yield), deprotection of the methyl ester (57% yield), and closing the ring through an intramolecular esterification. Each analog will be tested in an antibacterial bioassay against Staphylococcus aureus to reveal how the changes in the electronic profile affect antibiotic activity.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:20pm - 1:40pm
014 Zeis Hall

1:20pm

Preparation And Analysis Of Urinary Phthalate Conjugates
Phthalates are excreted after glucuronidation. However other possible metabolic pathways have not been examined. One possible route, amino acid conjugation, has been observed in compounds with structural similarity to phthalate monoesters. An amino acid conjugate of monoethyl phthalate (MEP) was synthesized in the lab with a low yield (

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:20pm - 1:40pm
123 Zeis Hall

1:20pm

Challengers Only
League of Legends, Riot Games long standing MOBA (Multiplayer Online Battle Arena), is the most popular PC game in the world. The community has enjoyed the entrance of the professional scene and many elements from traditional sports. Fantasy League of Legends is a site used by many that works similar to traditional fantasy games like fantasy football. Many users complain about the lack of personalization and web only access, but Riot Games has not made public the API for pro games. Challengers Only is an app designed to utilize the public Riot Games API to create a customizable fantasy app. This app focuses on normal users and creates scores from their performance metrics during their own games. In this fashion, the app encourages players to increase their level of play and compete with their friends in groups. Users are able to choose what time ranges to score, and what kind of scoring- such as averaging points over multiple games, or only recording their best game for the time period. This app has many stakeholders- including one developer, and four League enthusiasts used for testing purposes throughout development. We have worked to create two parts of this system- a backend that pulls the data and assigns scoring points from it; as well as a front-end that shows the information in a visually pleasing and clear fashion. The formation of two halves makes it easy to make adjustments if the API changes, or if we need to update the user interface in the future.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:20pm - 1:40pm
125 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

1:20pm

Faculty Salaries: An Analysis of Pay Disparities
Between 1993 and 2013, the number of faculty positions held by women in the United States increased by 14.5%. Despite the increase of female representation throughout academia, female faculty members on average earned 6.9% less than male faculty members as of 2014. Neoclassical theory proposes that the pay gap is a function of human capital differences such as educational attainment and an individual’s choice of academic fields to pursue. According to Neoclassical theorists, the pay gap is a function for the likelihood of women to prefer and choose "softer" fields of academia, fields such as literature and sociology that have lower salaries on average in comparison to engineering and computer science, fields highly concentrated with men. For example, according to BLS data from 2015, the average faculty salary in a literature department was $66,313, where the average salary in a computer science department was $89,112. Based off the neoclassical model, gender discrimination in the academic labor market exists only to the degree that gender inequalities in faculty salary cannot be illustrated through differences in human capital and the individual’s choice of field. Feminist theories suggest that the gender wage gap may not be a function of human capital differences or individual choices. Instead, it is argued that the occupational segregation of women into “soft” fields and men into “hard” fields is a result of patriarchal socialization of women into stereotypical female fields where they remain limited by gender norms. This thesis will explore the above theories by using faculty salary data to test the hypothesis that gender identity is a statistically significant factor of what influences faculty salaries at UNCA.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:20pm - 1:40pm
035 Karpen Hall

1:20pm

Throw Mama From The Play: The Motherless Works Of Eugene O'Neill
This thesis examines the characters in Eugene O'Neill's Anna Christie and Desire Under the Elms and argues that the main characters in these works are both abused and unable to achieve their goals because they lack a mother figure. The characters are finally given a chance to figure out who they could be independently from those around them, but I argue that they ultimately fail due to a lack of nurturing. As a result of their respective mother’s deaths, the characters sustain more abuse while trying to fill the necessary void that the lack of mothering has left behind; without which no character is able to function. My thesis demonstrates that there are no true romantic relationships, only misinterpretations and inappropriate interactions as a result of a lacking maternal connection. Additionally, I discuss O’Neill’s tortured childhood in which he suffered from an extremely traumatic home life as he was abandoned by his own mother. Providing the reader with his background further supports my claim that had a mother been present in his works (and his own life) the outcome of his writings would be very different.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:20pm - 1:40pm
232 Karpen Hall

1:20pm

Content Analysis Of Pro-Ana Websites: The Correlation With Themes Found In Anorexia Nervosa Patients
To assess the correlation with themes found on ‘pro-ana’ websites and the DSM-V diagnosable mental illness, anorexia nervosa, the author analyzes the top 30 frequently visited pro-ana websites from the most commonplace search engines, Google, Yahoo, and Bing!. Pro-anorexia, or pro-ana, websites take a positive and encouraging attitude towards eating disorders. The majority of website content explicitly encourages extreme thinness and advocate anorexia as a lifestyle choice, even a ‘religion,’ rather than an illness. This research examines the meaning of participation in a pro-anorexia website along with the content of each site and its relationship with common themes in DSM-V recognized disordered eating and eating disorders.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:20pm - 1:40pm
012 Karpen Hall

1:20pm

How Renovation Can Benefit A City
This paper explores the concept of how building renovations can benefit a city in an environmental aspect. Focusing on the city of Winston-Salem in North Carolina, this study compares the financial investment in renovating an existing structure over constructing a new structure from the ground up. Furthermore, this study seeks to find whether or not the financial savings in renovation can be used to incorporate ecofriendly aspects in the construction to make the structure a certified green building. Lastly, this study seeks to examine how or if the environmental impact of the renovation is communicated to the public.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:20pm - 1:40pm
016 Karpen Hall

1:20pm

Sign Of The Times: Messaging And Cohesion In The Women’s March On Washington
On January 21st, 2017 hundreds of thousands of individuals showed up to participate in The Women’s March in Washington, DC, with estimates as high as 470,000 participants. Citizens marched with banners and signs and with political messages printed on their clothing. Some messages called for unity and peace, some expressed disdain with leadership, some critiqued the lack of inclusivity within the movement, and some did all three. Through interviews with participants in the march and coding for frame alignment processes of over 100 signs, banners, and other props used at the March, this study aims to illuminate how these articles contributed to the sense of connection between participants during the march. The project sheds light on processes that create cohesion during social protests.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:20pm - 1:40pm
236 Zageir Hall

1:20pm

Exploring Orlando: Gender In 'Gender And Sex In Orlando” (1992)
This presentation will explore concepts of gender and sex within film, and the relationship between sex and gender, as well as the complexities of gender presentation and gender roles within film. Specifically, I will look at the 1992 film Orlando directed by Sally Potter, based on the novel by Virginia Woolf. By exploring the character of Orlando, played by Tilda Swinton, I will be able to investigate concepts of gender as the character experiences life as both a man and a woman. My presentation will explore the fluidity of Orlando’s gender and sex, as well as the roles that they must conform to due to their sex. By looking into Orlando’s storyline and characterization, I hope to gain a better understanding of more abstract concepts surrounding gender and sex, and the relationship between the two. Additionally, I hope to explore ideas of gender presentation and conformity (or lack thereof) by following the character of Orlando as they attempt to navigate life within the various gender roles that are placed upon them socially, physically, and sexually. This will also require me to interpret different artistic choices within the film such as costuming, aesthetic decisions, and editing.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:20pm - 1:40pm
221 Karpen Hall

1:40pm

Wilhelm Von Gloeden’s Idealized Boys: A Renaissance Of Pederasty?
Pederasty was a Greek social practice that was designed to prepare boys between the ages of twelve and seventeen to be ideal men of democracy (c. 600 BCE - 400 BCE). The practice was not a sexual fetish or perversion, but rather a civic duty performed by aristocratic Grecian men to train the upcoming generation of boys. There is an abundance of research on the social connotations and iconography of Greek pederasty. However, little to no research has compared the iconography of pederasty vases and the photography of Wilhelm von Gloeden (1856 - 1931). Von Gloeden’s late 19th century photographs portray idealized nude boys in relation to, but outside of, the social context of pederasty. Traditionally, pederasty scenes were painted as an informational tool for ritual aspects of the practice. While the nude boy is idealized in these scenes, he is not sexualized. Conversely, in the late 19th century photographs, all the boys are sexualized with the use of props, scenery, and physical composure that evoke an ancient Greek aesthetic. Furthermore, unlike traditional pederasty scenes, Von Gloeden’s work is purposefully devoid of an adult male presence, effectively making the viewer a voyeur who sexually objectifies the boys. It is with this shift from public practice to private fetish that Von Gloeden’s photographs are brought under the realm of the pedophilic gaze.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:40pm - 2:00pm
237 Owen Hall

1:40pm

Determinants In The C-Terminal Region Of Gα12 And Gα13 Allow Distinct Mechanisms Of Cell Growth Signaling
The G12/13 class of heterotrimeric G proteins, composed of the α subunits Gα12 and Gα13, is implicated in a variety of receptor-mediated cellular responses that include cell proliferation and cytoskeletal rearrangements. Gα12 and Gα13 are well-characterized activators of serum response element (SRE) mediated transcription, a pathway important in cell growth signaling. Invertebrate homologs of the G12/13 class harbor ability to drive cytoskeletal changes, but their signaling in cell growth has not been studied. We found the Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans α subunits, Concertina (Cta) and Gpa-12 respectively, to lack ability to drive SRE signaling as mutationally activated forms expressed in cultured human cells. To identify determinants of growth signaling that evolved in Gα12 and Gα13, we assembled chimeras using regions of Cta and Gpa-12 in place of corresponding sections of the mammalian α subunits. The C-terminal regions of Gα12 and Gα13 were found to utilize distinct structural features for driving SRE-mediated transcription. Insertion of a 45 amino acid region of Cta fully disrupted Gα12 signaling to SRE, whereas the same Cta substitution had no effect on Gα13 signaling. We identified key amino acids in this region required for Gα12 signaling to SRE, along with Gα12 target proteins that may require these residues for binding. We also generated Gα12 and Gα13 chimeras using regions of Gpa-12, and found Gα13 harboring the Gpa-12 C-terminus to exhibit normal SRE signaling. However, insertion of Gpa-12 sequence adjacent to the switch III region fully disrupted Gα13 signaling to SRE. These findings reveal key growth signaling determinants in the G12/13 C-terminal regions, and indicate that Gα13 utilizes structural features distinct from Gα12 in driving SRE-mediated transcription.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:40pm - 2:00pm
038 Karpen Hall

1:40pm

Identification Of Antibacterial Secondary Metabolites Produced By Bacteria Of The Chromobacterium Genus
Multidrug resistant bacterial infections, which arise due to misuse and overuse of antibiotics, are responsible for many nosocomial infections and are a threat to human health. Derivatization of known antibiotic compounds via total or semisynthesis can be time consuming and ineffective at targeting specific bacteria. This investigation focuses on bacteria found in the phytotelmata of Sarracenia pitcher plants and the natural antibiotic compounds they secrete under varying conditions. The aim of the project is to find single-producer and co-culture producing bacteria that secrete secondary metabolites effective a broad spectrum of Gram-positive and -negative pathogens. A Pseudomonas (CMCP E3) and Chromobacterium (CP2 SSIV) isolated in this study have been found to be effective against Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and the fungi Fusarium solani. The bacteria strains were cultured in minimal media containing either succinate or citrate that showed the densest growth after 72 hours. Final characterization of the CMCP E3 antibacterial compound was inconclusive. A 6 L succinate culture of the CP2 SSIV bacterium yielded on average 16 mg of crude product and 0.5 mg of antibacterial compound. Optimization of antibacterial isolation and characterization of CP2 SSIV secondary metabolite using column chromatography, NMR, and mass spectrometry is ongoing.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:40pm - 2:00pm
014 Zeis Hall

1:40pm

Proposed Changes To A General Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Of Qualitative Analysis Of Anions To Increase Student Success
The purpose for this project is to evaluate a qualitative analysis experiment of the general chemistry laboratory course, CHEM 111, in order to determine the extent of student success and to improve this experiment, for future cohorts of students. Qualitative analysis is the identification of unknown elements in a sample through a series of tests and is an important part in general chemistry education, it also aids in developing students critical thinking ability. In this experiment, an unknown solution of anions is identified through a series of chemical tests executed in a particular order via a student-generated qualitative analysis (“qual”) scheme. The “qual” scheme is created by the CHEM 111 student using their interpretation of observations obtained through chemical tests on single-anion solutions of known identity. Historically, there has been a sense among the CHEM 111 faculty that students have difficulty designing and understanding the role of the “qual” scheme in the analysis of the unknown. Furthermore, anecdotal evidence has suggested the nitrate anion (NO3-) is incorrectly identified substantially more often than the other anions used in this experiment. Survey data gathered from CHEM 111 students in Spring 2016, Fall 2016, and Spring 2017 does indeed indicate that many students encountered problems creating a “qual” scheme, and the anion most often incorrectly identified was NO3-. The survey results suggest the test for NO3- either needs to be explained more clearly to the students or substantially altered to reduce barriers to its success. A few chemical alterations of this test will be presented, as will information about how modification of the “qual” scheme can impact students’ success in identifying their unknowns.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:40pm - 2:00pm
123 Zeis Hall

1:40pm

2D Tile Mapping Made Easy: Bitwise Tile Mapper
When developing 2D games, creating visually appealing terrain, tile edges, and transitions can be a genuine struggle for many indie game developers. One of the most effective solutions is the bitwise tile-mapping method which creates intuitive code for neighbor-aware tile mapping. However, generating the images needed for this method still remains a genuine challenge for many developers. At the moment, there exists no such tool to independently streamline this aspect of the process. There are some all-in-one development environments that handle this issue, but attempting to use these tools for this purpose alone while developing outside these environments is cumbersome and unintuitive. Tile Mapper is a versatile and intuitive program that assists in the creation of tile-sets and transitions utilizing the bitwise tile-mapping method. It can be used by independent developers making 2D games that would utilize such tile-sets, and it is especially useful to those participating in game jams where both time and budget are extremely limited. This application allows the user to create or import all images needed for a full tile-set and compile them in a format that can be easily imported into a game utilizing the bitwise tile mapping method.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:40pm - 2:00pm
125 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

1:40pm

Socio-Economic Stratification And The Purpose Of Education From Marx To Bowles And Ginits
The Correspondence Principle, coined by Marxist’s economists Samuel Bowels and Herbert Gintis, considers the relationship between one’s socio-economic position and their educational achievement. A core principle of this theory is that education is a source of inequality as it does not exist to enhance one’s economic mobility within a population. They argue that income class is the primary determinant of the type and quality of education one receives. Thus it only serves to perpetuate the existent class structures and patterns of distribution. Children of working class families are expected to maintain similar types of employment as their parents. Therefore these children receive an education which transmits traits favorable to low-wage labor, such as punctuality, obedience, and the lack of control in production. This paper will embark on the bibliographic trail from which the Correspondence Principle is founded by reviewing the works of Karl Marx, Antonio Gramsci, and Louis Althusser, in order to analyze their role and influence upon this theory.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:40pm - 2:00pm
035 Karpen Hall

1:40pm

The Defense Of History: Willa Cather's Tell-Tale Heart
Willa Cather’s O’ Pioneers! examines the appropriation of art and spirituality through episodic historical narratives. This novel regenerates histories of greed, unrequited love, and madness to puncture Western ideologies of expansion, feeling, and spirituality. Despite her recognition of the complexities of history, Cather’s authorial intent is blunted by her own anxieties surrounding her existence outside of the heteronormative. Despite her recognition of the function of history, pulling from Phillip Sidney’s The Defense of Poesy and Edgar Allen Poe’s “A Tell-Tale Heart”, her semiotic methodology failed to reform conventions related to literary form and psychoanalytic thought. My thesis demonstrates that Cather’s audience did not understand her project and intention, in part because of Cather’s own concerns regarding censorship and her culture’s insistence on social conventions.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:40pm - 2:00pm
232 Karpen Hall

1:40pm

Comparing The Perceived Level Of Credibility Of News Stories Between Republicans And Non-Republicans
In this paper, I will discuss media credibility and the two ways it is categorized: the first focuses on how different media affect the viewers’ perception of credibility and the second examines the viewers’ preconceived ideas, their demographics, etc. as having more of an effect on their perception of credibility. My research will focus on the latter. After reviewing the related literature and recent survey results from Pew Research that show a declining level of trust in the government and the media among Republicans, I hypothesize there will be a significant statistical difference regarding the perceived credibility of a news story between survey respondents who identify as Republican and those who identify as non-Republican. After surveying two semesters’ worth of mass communication students, I will compare the difference between political affiliations. I hope to demonstrate a significant statistical difference between self-defined conservative and liberal students in terms of their evaluation of the credibility of a constructed news story.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:40pm - 2:00pm
012 Karpen Hall

1:40pm

Raising Awareness Through Social Media: The Effectiveness Of The 'Save The Bees' Campaign
This study explores the best practices of the “Save the Bees” social media campaign. This paper seeks to identify whether or not the campaign tailored messages differently for newspaper and social media content, and whether social media messages increased or decreased public awareness as evidenced through reach and engagement. In addition to collecting data from one national media outlet, the New York Times, and one local media outlet, the Asheville Citizen-Times, data were also collected on the campaign hashtag #savethebees. Using a combination of data collection and in-depth interviews with bee specialists, this qualitative study intends to inform readers about the best practices exhibited by the “Save the Bees” campaign in its mission to educate the public about this environmental issue.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:40pm - 2:00pm
016 Karpen Hall

1:40pm

A State-By-State Analysis Of Health Insurance Coverage And Racial Disparities
American healthcare accessibility has remained a national discussion for decades. With the 2010 passing of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, the United States’s executive office sought to narrow insurance disparities through targeting low-income individuals. However, across all fifty states and the District of Columbia, health care coverage still remains unevenly distributed, primarily disadvantaging Latino and African American populations. This comparative analysis seeks to identify regional and racial differences in health care coverage through a quantitative analysis of preexisting government and census data. This research is crucial for capturing how state-level policies and practices deferentially affect minority populations.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:40pm - 2:00pm
236 Zageir Hall

1:40pm

Variations In Queer Coding By Decade: Queerness In The 2000's
My abstract is going to center on the shift from queer coding and how its presentation has changed throughout different decades. The queer coding that is generally thought of when the phrase is brought up hails from around the 1950s, in which queer characters were heavily implied to be queer using camp and kitsch elements. Due to the time period, this more than makes sense. However, given how queerness has shifted to the mainstream, one has to wonder if there is a difference. While queerness is more in the public eye, that does not mean prejudice is gone. My project will examine exactly how queer coding functions in current society, how it presents itself, whether or not it is still necessary, and its similarities to the queer coding of decades past.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 1:40pm - 2:00pm
221 Karpen Hall

2:00pm

Whiskey Jugs And Tea Bowls: Conversations Between Japanese Mingei And Vernacular North Carolina Potters
The study of North Carolina pottery is an emerging field within art history. Most texts on the subject were published after 1980, and are generally framed through anthropological lenses focusing on the story of the potters more than the objects they create. Current research also concentrates on potters working before the start of the 20th century and thus, before the beginnings of the studio craft movement (1940s to present). In sharp contrast to this is the study of Japanese pottery, a long-standing area of intensive research. Some recent scholarship has made visual comparisons between early wood-fired Japanese wares and North Carolina pottery, alluding to the growing interest in North Carolina pots as art objects, but little research has been published on interactions between the two artist cultures. This paper will examine the 1952 Pottery Seminar that took place at Black Mountain College, NC and the conversations between Japanese mingei artists and local vernacular potters that the seminar facilitated. Sources for this inquiry include primary documents from the Seminar, oral histories told by North Carolina potters, and the written philosophies of mingei potters. Through these references, work by vernacular potters will be recontextualized with a focus on functionality, process, and aesthetic values.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 2:00pm - 2:20pm
237 Owen Hall

2:00pm

Investigation Of The Competitive Unimolecular Reactions Of Chf2chf2 And Chf2cf3
Amendments to The Montreal Protocol have called for a phase out of all hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC’s) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFC’s). These common gases are found in many household appliances such as refrigerators and air conditioners. Little is known about the 1,1-HX (X=halogen) elimination channel of HFCs; thus, we have designed a number of model compounds to learn more about the kinetics and mechanism of 1,1-HX elimination reactions. Here we present experimental and computational results for chemically activated CHF2CHF2 (HFC-134) and CHF2CF3 (HFC-125). The carbene from CHF2CHF2 has previously been reported to isomerize to CHF=CF2, but our calculations show that the isomerization barrier is too high. The carbene yield was measured by trapping with trans-2-butene. The 1,2-HF and 1,1-HF elimination rate constants were experimentally determined to be 4.6 x 105 s-1 and 1.3 x 105 s-1, respectively. The same method has been used to measure the 1,1 HF and 1,2 HF elimination rate constants of CHF2CF3. A variety of computational methods and basis sets were explored to find the 1,1 HF and 1,2 HF transition states and threshold energies for both compounds. A CF2 expulsion reaction pathway to yield fluoroform has also been identified in CHF2CF3.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 2:00pm - 2:20pm
014 Zeis Hall

2:00pm

Phenstatin Analogues With Non-Aromatic Attachments In Place Of The B-Ring
Microtubulin targeting agents have increased in popularity due to non-invasive methods of destroying cancer cells. Molecules like phenstatin have been studied heavily due to its reversible binding ability to the colchicine binding site and its toxicity towards cancer cells. The goal of this research is to produce four phenstatin derivatives with phenothiazine in location of the A-ring and non-aromatic attachments (3-, 4-, 7-, 8-membered rings) in location of the B-ring. The focus is to observe if size and torsional strain of the phenstatin derivatives will affect the binding affinity towards the colchicine binding site. Currently, the synthesis of a peptide coupling reaction utilizing N,N’-Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC)/4-Dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) is being examined as a method to produce the desired phenstatin derivatives with a cyclopropane and cyclobutane in place of the B-ring. A Grignard synthesis will be performed to synthesize the phenstatin derivatives with a cycloheptane and cyclooctane in place of the B-ring. Progress towards the synthesis of the four new phenstatin derivatives will be discussed.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 2:00pm - 2:20pm
123 Zeis Hall

2:00pm

The Fast And Curious: A Wireless Telemetry System For Better Design
In this interdisciplinary collaboration we design, develop, and test an FSAE Electric car to be entered into the 2016-2017 FSAE Electric race car competition in Lincoln, Nebraska. We develop a wireless telemetry system that accurately streams real time analytics to a website, enabling the engineering team to monitor and adjust the car for optimal performance. Most race car telemetry software is commercial and expensive; this project will help future engineering students develop quality race cars and learn how their design decisions affect the car. A Raspberry Pi running an Apache server is already in place to receive CAN messages containing the sensor data; all code for UNCA Motorsports is published on GitHub. We are adding the use of Apache Flink for stream processing, with a PostgreSQL database. We use Agile methods by working closely with the engineering team, monitoring accuracy of calculations, working towards a user-friendly interface, and continual integration with the hardware systems already in place.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 2:00pm - 2:20pm
125 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

2:00pm

Economics Of Religion And Happiness: An Empirical Analysis Of The Relationship Between Religious Belief And Subjective Well-Being In Asheville, North Carolina
The study of economics has experienced a surging interest in individuals’ self-reported happiness, or subjective well-being, in recent decades thanks to growing evidence that happiness can be measured and meaningfully influenced. In the interdisciplinary field of happiness economics, research has come across a highly influential variable that arguably has had one of the greatest influences on human behavior throughout history- religion. Although the positive relationship between religion and subjective well-being is well established, the mechanisms driving this relationship are yet to be fully understood. This paper will explore the well-established relationship further with an econometric analysis of the relationship between religion and subjective well-being in Asheville, NC. Data collected from various religious and nonreligious organizations in Asheville and including measures for multiple dimensions of religious practice is examined to identify how religion relates to subjective well-being in Asheville, NC. This research seeks to present an incremental step forward in comprehending the dynamic and recondite relationship between religion and happiness. Progress toward better understanding this relationship will likely provide valuable insight for the study of happiness economics as whole.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 2:00pm - 2:20pm
035 Karpen Hall

2:00pm

#Nuclear: A Study Of Public Opinion And Duke Energy's Nuclear Power Plants
This study is an analysis of communications regarding Duke Energy’s nuclear power campaigns and the responses by the media and social media users. The research analyzes the engagements and stories on mass media and social media sites over the past five years. The study seeks to find how social media and media stories affect the public opinion of the environmental aspects of Duke Energy’s operations in North and South Carolina. Data collected using Twitter was found using the hashtags #nuclear, #nuclearenergy, and #nuclearpower in large areas of the states. Local news stations with the highest ratings that have stories on Duke Energy’s nuclear plants were also used. This study will allow communications specialists to analyze how specific campaigns and news stories will affect the flow of information to the public.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 2:00pm - 2:20pm
016 Karpen Hall

2:00pm

Effects Of Hormone Treatments On Major Urinary Protein (MUP) Expression In AML12 Hepatocytes
Many social behaviors in mice, such as aggression, mating and territorial marking, are mediated by the major urinary proteins (MUPs) present in their urine. While the mouse genome codes for 21 MUPs, any given male mouse only expresses a subset of these proteins at a defined concentration. Mice are able to detect the identity and concentration of the MUPs they encounter, and as such, these proteins appear to act as an “individuality signal.” However, how a unique subset of MUPs is chosen for expression remains largely unknown. This study focuses on the control of gene expression of the 21 MUP genes, consisting of the highly similar “central” MUPs and the variable, divergent “peripheral” MUPs. Using hormone treatments on a cultured liver cell line, the expression of MUPs can be induced and studied, which allows for the manipulation of regulatory mechanisms. In an effort to understand the mechanisms controlling MUP choice and expression, this study explores the role that testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, and growth hormone treatments play in AML12 male hepatocytes. Utilizing RNA isolation, cDNA synthesis, and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), the effects of these hormones on MUP expression were analyzed and studied using gel electrophoresis. Identification of mouse growth hormone receptor (mGHR) and mouse androgen receptor (mAR) expression as well as methylation inhibition treatments provide greater insight toward the results of the hormone treatments. Because of their complex expression patterns, the MUPs serve as a good model system to study long standing molecular biology questions regarding mechanisms controlling gene expression.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 2:00pm - 2:20pm
038 Karpen Hall

2:00pm

The Framing Strategies Of Pro-Life Feminist Organizations
Social movements scholars have studied the use of “collective action frames,” to explain how organizations mobilize potential participants. By defining the cause and providing language and meanings to given mobilizations, groups of individuals are able to participate in a broadly shared understanding of movement goals. While the framing perspective is widely used, it has not yet been applied to pro-life feminist movements. This study analyzes and compares framing strategies among four pro-life feminist organizations by means of a content analysis of Twitter activity in the Spring of 2017 during and after the Women’s March on Washington. Preliminary findings suggests that the organizations are working to claim feminism as part of their own definition of human value, countering mainstream feminist discourse.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 2:00pm - 2:20pm
236 Zageir Hall

2:00pm

Camp Hollywood: An Obscure Genre's Lasting Impacts
Camp Hollywood is a genre of films/style of filmmaking prominently used in the mid-20th Century. “Camp films” were known for their coding, their tendency to play on unnatural elements, their intentionally bad taste & ironic value through tones of failed seriousness. This presentation will delve into the genre of Camp films, highlighting their elements as well as their impacts on society and cinema. One camp film released in 1967 called Valley of the Dolls, used these elements to portray a depiction of drug addiction and alcoholism, namely in the show business industry. The film gave a rather light, almost glorifying feel to the idea of drug use/addiction through its use of color, music, images, and humor throughout the movie even though the characters’ lives are being jeopardized which becomes more apparent and likely as the story unfolds. A very comparable modern take on this concept can be seen in Showtime’s Original Series Nurse Jackie, where instead of a famous star in showbiz, Jackie Peyton is a prodigious ER Nurse, in a New York City hospital, whose secret drug addiction is not presented as serious at first; but then begins to take her life down some dark turns. Nurse Jackie is a prime example of how Camp elements and old portrayals of situations like drug addiction have not necessarily changed much in the last 50 years and how certain themes used in camp are still significant in the 21st Century.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 2:00pm - 2:20pm
221 Karpen Hall

2:20pm

Brutal And Liturgical Narratives Of The Viennese Actionists
The Viennese Actionists (1960-1968), an art collective involving Gunter Brüs, Hermann Nitsch, and Otto Muehl, amongst others were known for their radically violent performance works. The Actionists used recurring practices of ritual, sacrifice and asceticism—all intrinsically tied to Catholicism—to create an embodied performance experience they defined as “direct art.” Due to the religious adaptations their work included, they were markedly different from other concurrent performance groups such as Fluxus and the Wiener Gruppe. Their art melded psychoanalysis, religion, and pain to reach a personal catharsis but also to fight the conservative post-World War II political and cultural state of Austria. Many scholars have delved into the Actionists’ use of Freudian themes like abreaction; however, this paper will examine the predominant liturgical motifs they adapted. Accordingly, consideration will be given to these motifs and their intersections with abreaction, a cathartic release accessed through pain. Pivotal performative works engaged in this research include, “Self-painting” (1964) by Brüs, “the Orgies Mysteries Theater” (1960) by Nitsch, and “Mama und Papa” (1964) by Muehl.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 2:20pm - 2:40pm
237 Owen Hall

2:20pm

Development And Evaluation Of A High-Throughput Screening Method Of Bacterial Antibiotic Activity
Multidrug resistant bacterial infections are one of the top three threats to global public health. Nearly all clinical antibiotics have lost their effectiveness due to the rapid onset of bacterial resistance. Unfortunately, there is not a robust and efficient method that allows researchers to study bioactive antibiotic compounds that come from novel secondary metabolites produced by bacteria and other microorganisms. This research will develop a high throughput liquid culture method, which can screen both single and multi-culture mixtures of bacteria for antibiotic product. This method is a quick five-day process, compared to the current agar overlay method, which takes about two weeks. This new method includes four basic steps: growing bacteria overnight, developing a liquid well assay which shakes for 48 hours, filtering the bacteria’s excreted secondary metabolites to a new well assay plate which shakes for 24 hours, and then finally testing for antibiotic activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 2:20pm - 2:40pm
014 Zeis Hall

2:20pm

The Quantification Of Phthalates In Wastewater Treatment Influent And Effluent
The French Broad River (FBR) serves as the home to several endangered species, raising concern due to the possible presence of endocrine-active compounds (EAC). Research shows that exposure to EACs in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent, namely phthalates, induces complications in reproductive physiology of fish and animals. Quantification of EAC concentration in WWTP effluent was conducted in Asheville, NC. Multiple phthalate monoester concentrations have been successfully detected in WWTP effluent above the LOD and LOQ, though the use of solid-phase extraction and a Shimadzu Liquid Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer-8040 (LCMS). Moving forward, metabolite concentrations acquired in WWTP influent will be compared to concentrations located in the effluent. This comparison will describe the effectiveness of WWTP removal of EACs, and increase awareness in the community for environmental sustainability. We hypothesize that processes within the WWTP might promote an increase in monoester concentration due to the cleaving of the glucuronide bond on phthalate glucuronide metabolites. Considering the WWTP makes use of a rotating biological contactor, the biofilm located on the surface of the contactors could be a prime location for glucuronide cleaving.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 2:20pm - 2:40pm
123 Zeis Hall

2:20pm

Team MVC Software Development In The Unity 3D Engine
This software development project implements a board game, King of Tokyo, using Object Oriented (OO) abstractions and MVC (Model View Controller) architecture. Undergraduate computer science curricula often lack group software development, so this project teaches team skills as well as software design skills and good coding practices. The game is written in the C# programming language in the Unity engine, self-described as “a flexible and powerful development platform [for] multi-platform 3D and 2D [interactive] experiences.” The engine is easy to test and has many well-documented instructional resources for C# development. Its methodology is component-based, which involves the use of renderers, scripts, and controllers to create game objects. This project combines OO development methodologies with Unity’s standard component-based game design. The software’s MVC architecture provides a separation between the game state (model) and the graphical representation of the game (view), which allows the team to work on both modules simultaneously and easily make design changes. Unity game objects implement this view by displaying graphics and notifying the controller of user inputs. The OO features of C#, such as interfaces, facilitate this logical separation between the model and the view. The game has been iterated upon over several semesters, and a functional version existed in Fall 2015. This semester, we remodel the user interface and game world, implement network multiplayer, and refine the AI.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 2:20pm - 2:40pm
125 Rhoades-Robinson Hall

2:20pm

Contracted Services: Governance Choice Within Transaction Costs Economics
In this study, I use 92 contracts governing the relationships between vendors supplying AT&T with call center services and AT&T to test the central prediction of Transaction Cost Theory which states that the variation of degree to which transaction-specific investments are associated with individual production relationships is influenced by the nature of the contracts that are associated with the relationships in predictable ways. Testing begins by identifying the degree of specificity of the assets associated with each of the 92 relationships. Governance attributes of each contract are assessed using scales that range from what theory predicts we would see used in a standard market to what we would expect to see from a flexible, long-term relationship. Using tables with rows representing the numbers of each of the 92 contracts characterized by the degree of specificity of the assets associated with them (low, medium, and high idiosyncrasy) and the columns representing the numbers of each of the 92 contracts characterized by their governance attributes (market, mixed, relational). Theory predicts that the number of contracts in each cell will follow a pattern, with the cells at the intersections most common. Finally, this prediction is tested using an analysis of Chi-Square test of the contingency tables.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 2:20pm - 2:40pm
035 Karpen Hall

2:20pm

Lived Experiences And Public Perceptions Of LGBT+ People In Costa Rica And Uruguay
This research explores the differences and similarities between the lived experiences and public perceptions of LGBT+ people in Costa Rica and Uruguay. Existing research shows that countries with higher rates of urbanization, education, income, and industrialization tend to be more accepting of LGBT+ sexualities; however, there are various countries in Latin America that do not conform to those findings. This study explores the general public opinion about LGBT+ people, the experience of being LBGT+, and the factors that led to differences between the two countries. The researcher employs a mixed-method approach, including interviews, public perception polls, and information on current laws and policies. This research helps us better understand how perceptions of LGBT+ issues are formed and what social and other factors influence the treatment of LGBT+ people.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 2:20pm - 2:40pm
236 Zageir Hall

2:20pm

Drag As Female Impersonation, And Only Female Impersonation
I want to focus on how the drag people are most familiar is only centered around female impersonation, contrary to the Harlem ball scene in the 1980s. Using Paris is Burning by Jennie Livingston (1990), I want to reference the experiences of this group and how drag wasn’t just an exaggerated woman, but a way to combat against societal standards. I will be using RuPaul’s Drag Race (RuPaul Charles, 2009) as a reference as well, centering on how the show has changed drag and the drag community as a contemporary form of entertainment. Paris is Burning is a documentary detailing the lives of queer people of color. It features the establishment of a community centered around nonconformity within societal expectation. The queer people portrayed in the film show the reason to compete in these balls in order to be something they can’t be, according to the world outside. It was a form of autonomy within their community to present themselves as businessmen, schoolgirl/boy, butch queen, etc. RuPaul’s Drag Race is a reality competition TV show where performers compete to be “America’s next drag race superstar.” The show places certain standards on a lot of the competitors, asking them to change their drag because it’s not “feminine” enough. Though the show pays homage to Paris is Burning quite often, the standard of drag becomes female impersonation. It eliminates any other forms of drag as those competitors are eliminated early if they don’t change into the more feminine drag. My purpose for this presentation is to show how drag has turned into what most people know of what drag is. I want people to consider why they like drag. What does it mean to them? Why do they enjoy it? Why is it funny for a man to “dress up” as a woman? I love drag because it’s able to blend femininity and masculinity. When both opposites are combined, it creates a beautiful art form that eliminates gender completely. I want to conclude by allowing drag to be enjoyable and fun, however, to know its complex history and how it’s turned into what it is today. I wanted the audience to know how it’s beneficial to the queer community, but also how it’s been taken by the straight community and how it’s been whitewashed. How it’s been appropriated, taken from queer people of color, and made for a white audience.


Wednesday April 26, 2017 2:20pm - 2:40pm
221 Karpen Hall

2:40pm

Microbial Isolation, Characterization And Antibiotic Extraction Of Bacterial Strains From The Southwestern United States
Multidrug resistant bacteria pose a huge threat to human health due to overprescription and misuse of antibiotics, an industry of agriculture reliance, and the decline of novel antibiotic discovery. According to the CDC at least two million people in the United States each year are infected with multidrug resistant bacteria and more than 23,000 succumb to those infections. Natural product (NP) isolation is a robust source of potential antibiotics even though recent random selection of organisms which undergo novel NP biosynthesis is rare. Understanding how ecological and evolutionary pressures drive NP synthesis may lead to new discoveries in novel NP production and isolation. This research involves the isolation and purification of 101 bacterial soil samples from the Southwestern United States and subsequent screening of those bacteria for antibiosis induction through coculture and quadculture agar overlay and lawn inhibition assays. Bacteria found to be strong antibiotic producers were then characterized by 16S ribosomal polymerase chain reactions and subjected to scale up and extraction to isolate the produced antibiotic. Currently antibiotics produced by three bacteria, a Bacillus strain (SS729) and two Streptomyces strains (SS735 and SS746) are being isolated and characterized. SS735 was found to have antibiotic activity against Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus while the other two strains, SS729 and SS746 were found to have antibiotic activity against both Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Escherichia coli in agar overlay inhibition assays.

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Wednesday April 26, 2017 2:40pm - 3:00pm
014 Zeis Hall